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M1-ATX current on ACC line ?

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  • M1-ATX current on ACC line ?

    Has anyone measured the current on ACC for a M1-ATX ? I will probably have to switch that line electronically and need to know what type of transistor is required.

  • #2
    it is next to nothing.

    And all cars have a switched line. Can you turn on your fans when the car is off? If no, then you have a switched line. And since the m1/m2 draws negligable current (in the mA range) I doubt you are exceeding that line. If you are a simple relay or NPN will do the trick.
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    • #3
      Thanks toaster. Next to nothing meaning < 1mA ? < 20 mA ? <100 mA ?

      I do have a switched line but want to use a push button to also manually trigger on/off- hence the question.

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      • #4
        Whats wrong with just using a latched push button like this for on/off?
        Gen 1: Pentium 3 1GHz - ATX - 2005
        Gen 2: Pentium M 1.6GHz - ITX - 2006
        Gen 3: Pentium M 2.0GHz - 5.25" SBC - 2007
        Gen 4: (coming soon: Core2 Duo - 3.5" SBC - 2009)
        ...it never ends

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        • #5
          I want to use a Hyundai stock button which is push only.

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          • #6
            Here is one possible method:

            Here is a circuit that will use a single momentary button to "Latch" the PC on. There are many other variations in the same thread that one is posted in.

            http://www.mp3car.com/vbulletin/720318-post32.html
            ~Jimmy

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            • #7
              Very nice JimmyFitz !
              I have spent the past few days looking for transistor-only circuits to achieve toggling with the pushbutton. The circuit is almost ready on my breadboard, except for some value tweaking- but again for that I would need the M1 ignition current specs. With my M1 deeply buried inside the dash already that's not easy to come by.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Cross_ View Post
                Very nice JimmyFitz !
                I have spent the past few days looking for transistor-only circuits to achieve toggling with the pushbutton. The circuit is almost ready on my breadboard, except for some value tweaking- but again for that I would need the M1 ignition current specs. With my M1 deeply buried inside the dash already that's not easy to come by.
                As you see, I used relays instead of transistors so I don't know how much current the switched input draws. The relay won't be affected by the current draw, so you don't need to know what it is. I'm glad my circuit is of use to you. It is still working fine for me after more than a year.

                As for tweaking, the LED and 1K resistor are not required. The 470uF cap determines the length of the reset pulse when the key is turned back on. A smaller cap would probably still work fine. Be sure the voltage rating is 25 Volts or more. The 4.7 K resistor forces the cap to discharge after pulsing so that the reset feature will work again the next time you need it. If you don't use the same relay I did then you may need to tweak the resistor and cap values.
                ~Jimmy

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                • #9
                  Okay, it's working on the breadboard. Now on to the soldering.
                  M1 draws 1 mA from ACC wire when not in use.

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