Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

M1-ATX 90 watt Smart Automotive Power Supply

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • M1-ATX 90 watt Smart Automotive Power Supply

    This thread will serve to post all relative information for the M1-ATX 90 watt Smart Automotive Power Supply.

    This thread is not to be used for troubleshooting, but rather for FAQ type responses.
    Jan Bennett
    FS: VW MKIV Bezel for 8" Lilliput - 95% Finished

    Please post on the forums! Chances are, someone else has or will have the same questions as you!

  • #2
    Will the M1-ATX run the Intel D945GCLF2 Board?

    It appears that the Motherboard may have an extra connector.

    Thanks in advance!

    Comment


    • #3
      Can I take power from the 12V rail of this power supply to connect to the P4-12V connector on my new motherboard? I don't want to get a new PSU just for the extra connector.

      I guess I should ask. Will 90 Watts be enough to power a D201GLY2A mother board and a SATA hard drive? If it isn't big enough I guess I will just have to get an M2-ATX.

      Comment


      • #4
        I have an issue with my M1-ATX just like the one that has been reported for M2-ATX as well:

        I want my PC to hibernate on Acc loss but whenever I cut Acc power to the M1-ATX using the ignition key the PC does a hard reset, starts to reboot and finally gets killed by the M1-ATX hard power-off timer. The odd thing is that it only happens if I use the key. If I leave the key in Acc position and instead manually disconnect the Acc wire to the PSU the PC hibernates just fine.

        I discussed this with an electronics engineer and we came to the conclusion that this probably happens because the acc bus in the car might be briefly connected to ground when turning the key. I would need something faster than a multimeter to find out.

        Anyhow: I put a rectifier diode (100V, 3A) inline with the Acc input to the PSU and the problems are gone.

        /Erik

        Comment


        • #5
          FYI: For the M1-ATX power supply. There is a J3 connector which does not have pinout voltages in the manual. The manual states that it is for additional HDD devices and leaves it at that. Although the molex connector is a standard EPS 8-pin socket, its pin-out voltages are NOT standard. They are two rows of a standard 4-pin molex connectors. Diagram below:


          _______________________
          | 12V | 0V | 0V | 5V |
          |_____ |____ |____ |____ |
          | 12V | 0V | 0V | 5V |
          ______ |____ |____ |____ |
          |_____ | <-------CLIPPY THINGY


          +1 for poor ascii art =)


          I was able to modify an 8-pin connector and use it as a 12V supply rail for my motherboard on the P4 connector. It saved on extra wiring and it was quite handy.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by RESET View Post
            Can I take power from the 12V rail of this power supply to connect to the P4-12V connector on my new motherboard? I don't want to get a new PSU just for the extra connector.

            I guess I should ask. Will 90 Watts be enough to power a D201GLY2A mother board and a SATA hard drive? If it isn't big enough I guess I will just have to get an M2-ATX.
            I know this is old - but I just tried doing this. I bought a converter cable from 4 pin molex to P4-12V - however, my new setup took too much power on the 12V rail and I could not power up (set up briefly clicked.) The m1-atx offers I think 2A on the 12V rail, meaning only 24W total, which is not very much. If anyone else reads this, the M2-ATX offers 12V at 8A, for 96W and is much better suited for higher power applications, P4-12V included.

            Comment

            Working...
            X