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Yup, i just fried something on the m2 atx

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  • Yup, i just fried something on the m2 atx

    So i was working on setting up the comp in the car, and i figured i might as well test the comp on the car before i mount everything and run all the wires. So i set up a little system haphazardly and dont take my time or the precautions needed. Long story short i was working on the the comp and the battery wire shorted out at the connection to the m2-atx and the metal case of the pc. Some component on the m2 atx got burnt a bit, i cant identify it. The little pin on it popped up and wouldn't go back down. Now i dont know what it is but it kind of looks, and acted like, a little circuit breaker. What is the component? Can i replace that specific component? Should i just give in and buy another power supply?
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Anyone know what that is?

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    • #3


      Marked with red circle. Element name FR1.
      J6 Controls amplifier via remote ON/OFF. Left pin is RMT, Right pin is GND

      1.
      2.
      Slovenia, Europe
      best on-line radio

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      • #4
        How many pins are soldered to it underneath. Almost looks like and inductor?? but not sure. You should un-solder it to see what it looks like.

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        • #5
          its not j6, that is the little connector pin right next to it. It is labeled "fb1". Yes it does kind of look like an inductor, and it seems to be ceramic. I tried to un-solder it...unsuccessfully.there are 8 pins soldered, one for each side of the 4 metal pins on the top side. The short also turned the printed conductor between the two shorted pins black on the printed board. Yea but anyway, could not get it out by trying to un-solder it.
          Attached Files

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          • #6
            The connector which you pulled out. Can you remove it? If so you can heat the bottom of board and solder the missing link back in.

            Contact Tech Support

            You can ask then on e-mail stated in link how can they help you. I think you can arrange to send them damaged goods and they will fix it for a few $$$$$. Texas and California are not divided by great mileage.
            Slovenia, Europe
            best on-line radio

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            • #7
              yes i can remove it, and i have tried that. It just doesnt want to sit back in as low as the other pins. Its strange, i dont know what the deal is. But if i could get it back in then it should work again right? Thats what i figure but i still cant force it down. If you notice on the pic its a little bent, thats from me trying to push it back down while melting the solder.

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              • #8
                I think its some kind of fuse.
                Slovenia, Europe
                best on-line radio

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                • #9
                  yea i thought that might be the case but i could not find anything that looked like it on the internet.

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                  • #10
                    It actually does look more like a fuse after looking at the track layout underneath. If its a manufactured part you should be ably to find it - you just have to know what its called.

                    If all else fails you can send it back...

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                    • #11
                      yea thats part of the problem, i cant find it anywhere, or find any pictures of anything that looks like it. Also i tried un-soldering it and taking it off to better inspect it but i cant get it off, it feels like it may be more than solder holding it down. Or i could very well just not be doing it right. I may end up sending it back. I sent customer support an email, im still waiting on a reply.

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                      • #12
                        It's a quad line ferrite bead, hence the component designation FB1 or FR1. This is not a fuse but a filter component working similar to an inductor.
                        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrite_bead
                        Ferrite beads are similar to inductors in some ways but work especially in an area that is parasitic for general purpose inductors. They essentially act as a high impedance, or "resistor" to high frequency EMI/RFI electronic noise. The absorbed energy is converted to heat and dissipated by the ferrite, but only in extreme cases will the heat be noticeable.
                        Same type of component at this one from Steward, but not nessesarily the same specifications:
                        Datasheet: http://www.steward.com/web_info/CADP...0T0-10-D-2.pdf
                        Website: http://www.steward.com/web_parts.asp...ower+Filtering

                        The above mentioned Steward 29F0429-0T0-10 is sold among other places at these two online shops:
                        http://mouser.com/Search/ProductDeta...OpHBLWAw%3d%3d
                        http://search.digikey.com/scripts/Dk...me=240-2495-ND


                        Just replace the burnt wire inside the ferrite bead with a new one with the same gauge, you can use the lead from a resistor or similar. And make sure the PCB tracks are not burnt away too or make sure to repair them by soldering some wire on top.

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                        • #13
                          it looks like a ferrite bead used to suppress RF Noise . If it is it it can safely be bypassed by jumping b+ to the fuse.

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                          • #14
                            yall are god among men, thank you so much. Ill get to workin on it, i appreciate your help!!!

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