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  • Dual alternators

    Has anyone run a dual alternator setup? Wouldn't it be a better setup to run the pc from its own electrical source instead of the unit attached to the battery?

  • #2
    Originally posted by chipmaster View Post
    Has anyone run a dual alternator setup? Wouldn't it be a better setup to run the pc from its own electrical source instead of the unit attached to the battery?
    We run them at work, and in my opinion, you would not gain much if anything by running a separate electrical system. Get a decent power supply, good grounding, and big enough power cables and you won't have to worry about interference.
    "stop with the REINSTALLS, what do you think we got some lame-o installer!!!" - mitchjs
    RevFE
    My Shop

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    • #3
      Originally posted by chipmaster View Post
      Has anyone run a dual alternator setup? Wouldn't it be a better setup to run the pc from its own electrical source instead of the unit attached to the battery?
      Absolutely not! The battery works as a bit of a line conditioner. If anything, get a separate battery and a battery isolator, but don't go straight from an alternator to a PC.
      Greedy
      -Adj.
      Anybody who makes significantly more money than you do.

      The Hoe-Puter Worklog

      Progress (Phase one):

      Planning:
      [----------] 97.3%
      Parts Aquisition:
      [----------] 95%
      Install:
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      • #4
        I was thinking of running another battery and alternator to just power the pc and any other electronics.

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        • #5
          Unless you're running a big honking sound system, the second alternator is overkill.

          Think about it. What's your max PSU output? 150 watts? so divide the wattage by the voltage (13.2Vdc). If you MAX OUT your PSU, you're still only drawing 11.5 amps. In reality, you'll probably never draw more than half that, unless you're gaming while majorly overclocking some water-cooled system with a crazy graphics card, while ripping DVDs and streaming music...

          Like I said, if you want, you could throw a deep cycle battery in with an isolator, and call it good. But even that is probably unnecessary.

          Take the money for the alternator setup, and put it towards a new Core i7 or a Blueray burner.
          Greedy
          -Adj.
          Anybody who makes significantly more money than you do.

          The Hoe-Puter Worklog

          Progress (Phase one):

          Planning:
          [----------] 97.3%
          Parts Aquisition:
          [----------] 95%
          Install:
          [----------] 95%

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          • #6
            Definitely just go with an isolated battery system if you want. The second alternator would just provide a separated noisy 12V to your computer, instead of the built-in noisy 12V. A second battery and isolator on the other hand, will provide another sink for that noise, and help calm the noise down a bit. If you still are unsatisfied, you can add a CAP at the PC/Amp to absorb any noise that is left.
            2000 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer - Bi-Fuel Gasoline/CNG
            Intel D945GCLF2 w/512MB RAM, CL Audigy w/KxProject, M2-ATX, Lilliput EBY701

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            • #7
              Aux Alternators should be tied in the main system. On mine the computer fields the alternator only when needed. Aux batteries should be relayed not isolated. And yes, batteries are the best filter and the only reason the system is DC.
              06 Silverado LBZ wants onboard everything...

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              • #8
                i always used an isolator in my audio system. there is at least a .7 volt drop across the isolator though. i work at an armored vehicle builder and all we use in our swat trucks is a isolator circuit that uses a large solenoid. the company is called kussmaul and they have some neat stuff. on their website, they list these as 2 separate parts but there is a kit part number also. it goes for about $140. definently better than an isolator. and yes, i will upgrade this summer.
                99.9% complete.

                http://www.cardomain.com/ride/212327

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                • #9
                  Exactly, that large 'solenoid' is actually a continuous duty relay. 'Isolators' use diodes, always accompanied by the needless voltage drop and resulting inaccurate voltage regulation. You can just buy the relay for $20-40. Many to choose from.
                  06 Silverado LBZ wants onboard everything...

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                  • #10
                    Depends on the alternator you use. Some alternators have a remote sense line, which can be hooked up to an isolator's 'sense' terminal, which will feed the dropped voltage back to the alternator for regulation purposes, resulting in the alternator outputting the extra .7 volts. Relays are a nice way around having to do this, but lack the reliability of a good isolator.

                    Some other systems already sense the voltage at the Battery (most 98 and newer Fords do this I believe), thereby eliminating the problem from the start.
                    2000 Ford Expedition Eddie Bauer - Bi-Fuel Gasoline/CNG
                    Intel D945GCLF2 w/512MB RAM, CL Audigy w/KxProject, M2-ATX, Lilliput EBY701

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