Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

12 Volt 5 Amp DC-DC converter

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • 12 Volt 5 Amp DC-DC converter

    Anyone know where to buy these at?

    http://www.umec-web.net/products/pdf...0%20series.pdf
    1999 voyager pontoon boat
    (soon to be computerized)

  • #2
    I would email either of these 2 offices in the US.

    sales@umecintl.com

    umecsales@umec-usa.com

    Comment


    • #3
      LM1084

      5A voltage regulators do exist, but are not very commen, I've been searching for them for a long time. National semiconductor makes them I believe, But I've seen only one company who sells them (And than only in large numbers or as sample's).

      name of the regulator series: LM1084

      The company:

      http://www.ebv.com

      Stock search:

      http://www.ebv.com/prodserv/stocksea...ps_stocksearch

      They come in 3.3V , 5V, and 12V with 5A. cost: about 1,50- Euro

      P.S: If you have a 12 Volt battery, keep in mind that there always is a voltage drop across the regulator. With the best regulators (low-dropout) that voltage drop is about 1 Volt. So you have to have a Voltage of 13 Volt minimal to let the regulator function properly at all times.

      Greets, Erik

      Comment


      • #4
        12 volt, 5A

        http://www.digikey.com/scripts/US/DK...84IT%2D12%2DND
        [H]4 Life
        My next generation Front End is right on schedule.
        It will be done sometime in the next generation.
        I'm a lesbian too.
        I am for hire!

        Comment


        • #5
          Regulators are fairly common... These are DC-DC converters though... 9-18 volts in, 12 volts at 5 amps out....

          (And you can always just use multiple lower amp regulators in parallel to get higher currents)

          Mike
          1999 voyager pontoon boat
          (soon to be computerized)

          Comment


          • #6
            Multible regulators

            It's true you can set multible regulators in parralel, but although they are of the same brand and type, they never are exactly the same. This makes one of the regulators do all the work, while the other one sits back and waits for the first one to run out of options, at 1A. At that point the second regulator will activate to accompany the first one. This way one of those regulators will "die" much faster than the other. This isn't really a problem but one of those regulators will probably be half way his melting point all the time, so you have to have good cooling.
            The 1A regulators aren't really expensive anyway

            By the way, I'm building a whole new computer DC-DC convertor for a school project. Sproggy like. As soon as it's working I'll try to put it on the net.

            Greets, erik

            Comment

            Working...
            X