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  • totally lost on power supply

    I just got my Intelligent DC-DC Converter with USB Interface (this one)which I ordered from the mp3car store. It arrived today and I have no idea what to do with it, it came with no instructions or anything. How do I wire it up to power my laptop, and how do set the voltage?
    I'm totally lost with this, someone please help.

  • #2
    manuals: looks pretty self-explanatory
    http://resources.mini-box.com/online...USB-manual.pdf
    http://resources.mini-box.com/online...ion-manual.pdf

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    • #3
      Well it's not for me. I'm far from being an electrical engineer.

      Comment


      • #4
        ok then you'll have to provide some more information.
        which machine you're trying to power up, what voltage does it require (look at the AC adapter).

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        • #5
          computer is an Asus EEE 701 netbook, requires 9.5V 2.135A

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          • #6
            An electrical engineer would probably have used an LM317K adjustable voltage regulator (3A version else with additional power transistor) assuming operation from about 12-20V.


            But it is a programming issue - not electrical.

            You set the jumpers to locations 4&5 for "Power 3" = 9V.

            Then it's via software which I assume is inbuilt or downloadable via its USB, else from its support site.

            But Punky man explain further....

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            • #7
              OK, so I've recently taken up a new interest in this project after leaving everything in a closet for a few months since I didn't know how to hook it up? I've search and can't figure out where to plug the wires.

              I'm guessing the white black and red wires are the power input, I'll connect that to my power source (car's battery) or to a 12v sourece in that car. Then the smaller red and black wres plug in somewhere on the motherboard of the computer. Is this correct so far?

              Where do the yellow and black wires go? Anyone got some pics of one of these installed?

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              • #8
                i understand that you are not a electrical engineer, but i really think your looking at it the wrong way. granted, the manuals are not written very clearly, and it took me 2-3 times to locate the info... but try to break it down into smaller sections at a time, and it should start to get clearer..

                most of the info you need for connecting the dc-dc unit is on page 2 of the first link Punky posted.

                CONFIG: Configuration jumpers for Voltage, Mode and Timings.
                Left mini-FIT connector: Power input, V(in), GND, Ignition.
                Right mini-FIT connector: Power output V(out), GND.
                PSW: Soft ON/OFF control for motherboard. Connect this to motherboard
                ON/OFF pins if you want the motherboard to be controlled by the unit.
                USB: mini-USB type B jack. Connect this to a PC to access advanced
                settings.
                STATE: State LED
                Vaux: Provides unregulated switched input, to be used in automotive modes
                to power various peripherals. Also, in automotive mode, Vaux can be used as
                ‘thump’. Vaux should be closer to V(In) in this case.
                My OLD 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT:
                "The Project That Never Ended, until it did"


                next project? subaru brz
                carpc undecided

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                • #9
                  I think I understand it a little better, but I'm still not totally clear. Red/Black/White wires go to my power source, in this case my car battery. Small red/black goes to the mother board of the PC, is this what will make it auto wake/shutdown? Yellow/Black wires go to AC jack on the PC?

                  A few question though, when wiring in the Red/Black/White wires, red is positive white is neg and black is ground. On my car everything electrical doesn't have a negative return, the ground acts as the negative return. Can I just wire the red right to my car battery, and the ground either the black or white wire somewhere to the chassis? Then the Yellow and black wires I slice into the plug from the AC adapter and just plug it in normal to the laptop?
                  And the usb, this does not have to be plugged in all the time for this to work, only when I need to configure the DC-DC converter?

                  Am I on the right track?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    being that there really aren't any pic's of the wires, and i don't own this particular power supply, i am going off the manual for connections... so just keep in mind that some of this might be a shot in the dark..


                    the connector on the left:

                    the white wire(pin 3) connects to a switched power source to tell the power supply to tell the computer to turn on. the manual is very vague about this, so i assume that it is a standard remote input signal which should be a +12v signal..


                    the red wire (pin 4) connects to the battery-- just make sure to fuse the wire within 12" of the battery.

                    then the black wire-- which i assume connects to pins 1+2 gets connected to ground-- typically the car chassis-- usually bolted down(i usually use existing bolts/screws for this)


                    above the main power input, is the PSW connector-- these wires connect to the motherboard power switch to tell the pc to turn on and off. i do not see any indication of wire color, or polarity listed in the manual for this set of wires.


                    about in the middle of the board is VAUX-- this is unregulated power, and the manual states that this can be used for external devices that need to turn on with the power supply(like a monitor, or speaker amp)


                    on the far right of the board, is the output voltage-- pins 1+2 are ground(negative),and i assume use a black wire, and pins 3+4 are positive-- i assume they use a yellow wire..




                    according to the manual, it appears that you do not need to keep the usb constantly connected to a pc. it looks like you only need to connect it when making setting changes..

                    though you will need to make sure that the jumpers are set up correctly for the correct voltage output before attempting to power the pc it is meant for..

                    from what the manual states, it should also be ok to power the pc from another source, program the power supply to work as needed(output voltage, timing settings, etc) and then power the pc from the dc-dc unit.
                    My OLD 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT:
                    "The Project That Never Ended, until it did"


                    next project? subaru brz
                    carpc undecided

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      first of all, if you're trying to use an asus eeepc 701, it only needs a 9.5v DC source. I powered mine with a $5 car charger adapter from dealextreme.com: http://www.dealextreme.com/details.dx/sku.19383

                      basically i just used that 12v-9.5v adapter hardwired to a fuse and a 12v source that only turns on with the ignition in the on position. Then I just soldered a couple wires from the power switch of the EeePC to a push-button switch and relocated it to the dash to turn it on. So, in my setup the battery will charge whenever the car is on and it won't charge when the car is not on, but it can still run off the battery for a while... for example when it's shutting down. check out my build thread for more info.
                      COMPLETED! 02 VW Golf TDI 7" Eee PC Budget Build

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        ^^^
                        Right now I've got it hard wired in with a car adaptor spliced into a 12V source, unfortunately if the car is not running there is not enough power from the adaptor to run the external usb hard drive. And the PC will constantly switch from AC to battery modes, with the pop up constantly flashing on the screen. Pretty annoying. One of the most frequent thing I use the PC for is to flash different tunes to the cars ECU, or to check the ECU learned history for fueling and timing. This requires the ignition to be on, but the engine off. So while I do this I constantly have it switching from battery to AC.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by soundman98 View Post
                          being that there really aren't any pic's of the wires, and i don't own this particular power supply, i am going off the manual for connections... so just keep in mind that some of this might be a shot in the dark..


                          the connector on the left:

                          the white wire(pin 3) connects to a switched power source to tell the power supply to tell the computer to turn on. the manual is very vague about this, so i assume that it is a standard remote input signal which should be a +12v signal..


                          the red wire (pin 4) connects to the battery-- just make sure to fuse the wire within 12" of the battery.

                          then the black wire-- which i assume connects to pins 1+2 gets connected to ground-- typically the car chassis-- usually bolted down(i usually use existing bolts/screws for this)


                          above the main power input, is the PSW connector-- these wires connect to the motherboard power switch to tell the pc to turn on and off. i do not see any indication of wire color, or polarity listed in the manual for this set of wires.


                          about in the middle of the board is VAUX-- this is unregulated power, and the manual states that this can be used for external devices that need to turn on with the power supply(like a monitor, or speaker amp)


                          on the far right of the board, is the output voltage-- pins 1+2 are ground(negative),and i assume use a black wire, and pins 3+4 are positive-- i assume they use a yellow wire..



                          OK, I think I'm getting this:

                          here is a picture for reference:


                          OK so the wires on the left (these are the Red,White and Black ones). I take the white one and wire it to a 12V source that turns on off with the cars ignition, say the radio or the cigarette lighter. The red one I wire straight to the battery (with a fuse), and the black I ground to the chassis. I plug small black and red wires into the mother board.
                          Then the wires on the right (the yellow and black ones), there are two yellow wires and two black wires. Is this two positives and two negative to power the computer and one oter device, say an external hardrive? I just need to cut off the plug off the end of my power adaptor and wire it to one black and one yellow and wire, then plug into the computer like normal right?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Like I said, a 3A linear converter...

                            But having recently been made aware of these cheap (eg) DC Power Modules, why bother with linear?


                            PS - ooops - delayed response.
                            You'd normally want a low voltage sensing or off option etc - I thought off with ignition etc was ok in your case....

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              correct.

                              i believe they offer 2-yellow and 2-black wires for devices that take more power then one wire will supply, so you should be able to tie both yellow, and both black together, and then connect them to the device.


                              Originally posted by OldSpark View Post
                              Like I said, a 3A linear converter...

                              But having recently been made aware of these cheap (eg) DC Power Modules, why bother with linear?

                              i was really happy you posted these for a separate project i was working on until i read the last part:
                              "Note: output is always higher than the input by 1.0V
                              Example: Input 6V, output is 7V~35V adjustable "

                              though it appears they have another model that is opposite..(though no better then the sharp low loss v-reg's i was planning on using anyways)
                              My OLD 2001 Mitsubishi Eclipse GT:
                              "The Project That Never Ended, until it did"


                              next project? subaru brz
                              carpc undecided

                              Comment

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