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200 Watt DC-DC PSU

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  • 200 Watt DC-DC PSU

    Just hooked up one of these bad boys, we'll see how well it works when I get it next week.

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...&category=3670

    http://www.ridemods.com/secondsig.jpg

  • #2
    Does that need to be regulated, or do you think it works straight out the box?

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    • #3
      I dont think so.
      http://www.ridemods.com/secondsig.jpg

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      • #4
        The auction says

        Input: 10.5 - 15v DC.
        Output 200watts @ 12v DC.
        Approx. 16 amps draw at full power!

        if it takes an input of 10.5 - 15v DC I'm guessing it has a regulator built right in. I'll post a full review of it once I get it and install my system.
        http://www.ridemods.com/secondsig.jpg

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        • #5
          The EBay ad says 10.5 to 15 volts input, so i would say no that it doesn't have to be regulated. Pretty impressive tho. I bet that baby gets hot considering how small and the amount of heat it dissipates (200W !!).

          Let us know about this.
          Dual Lilliput's 70NP/C/T
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          • #6
            Reality check: What do you think will happen to the flimsy little power connector and wires on the input side if you draw 16A through it? I don't think it will last very long..

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            • #7
              What will happen is nothing. We're talking 16A not 100A. I know a few who have bought from audioforge the P120/A and they seem happy with it so hopefully this lives up to the name.
              Mine needs to be updated.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by samc
                What will happen is nothing. We're talking 16A not 100A. I know a few who have bought from audioforge the P120/A and they seem happy with it so hopefully this lives up to the name.
                16A is enough to power a small industrial hydraulic motor. I just replaced a switch that was rated for 16A and the thing was burnt up to a crisp. Just make sure you keep the thing cool or you may need to break out the fire extinguisher.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by e_z_street
                  16A is enough to power a small industrial hydraulic motor. I just replaced a switch that was rated for 16A and the thing was burnt up to a crisp. Just make sure you keep the thing cool or you may need to break out the fire extinguisher.
                  Extremely small motor, I guess.

                  My best guess from the pic is 14AWG wire. That should be adequate for [email protected]

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by eCarô
                    Extremely small motor, I guess.

                    My best guess from the pic is 14AWG wire. That should be adequate for [email protected]
                    But that coaxial connector has got to go. Anderson powerpole is the defacto standard for secure high current connection as far as I'm concerned.

                    Check_them_out
                    Buy_them

                    No, I don't work for either company.

                    I just ordered one of these DC-DC supplies also. Looks like a great product to replace my weak ITPS/PW70a. We'll see...
                    SeeYa! -Jim-

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                    • #11
                      16A through those wires will be **just fine**.

                      Also, I know its a small point, but worth mentioning, a hydraulic motor uses fluid to drive it, not electricity
                      .//Daren
                      (Epia M10000/C134) (C137/MII 10000) Liliput /Opus 150W/DVD/512MB/80GB/Hummer H1
                      MediaCar/CoPilot7/Routis

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                      • #12
                        Have fun survive'n a crank....
                        2005 Ford Mustang GT <- - - UPDATED PICTURES

                        2003 KAWASAKI Z1000 - CUSTOM MODZ

                        MBK (AIM = IllMBKllI)

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                        • #13
                          There is only *one*sure fire way to survive a crank with a load like a computer draws, and that is an auxillary isolated battery. Especially in a diesel where the glow plugs cycling draw a huge current. My vehicle has two (in parallel) batteries for cranking, and one for the electronics, the alternator charges all three, but the 3rd battery is isolated from the others. The cranking batteries are deep cycle Optima yellow tops, and the electronics battery is an Optima red top.
                          .//Daren
                          (Epia M10000/C134) (C137/MII 10000) Liliput /Opus 150W/DVD/512MB/80GB/Hummer H1
                          MediaCar/CoPilot7/Routis

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                          • #14
                            mobileh1 .... can a like 2 or 3 farad capasitor do that job too ?? instead of having 2 batteries or in your case 3 ??

                            I've seen people with killer sound in their car , with capasitors , crank the motor and sound keeps going ,,, also the capasitor is used for when the amps need more power (powerfull amps heh)



                            I may be wong ... I would like to know how it should really be done if im wrong ..

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                            • #15
                              Thats a very interesting idea. I suppose so. The problem would be that the capacitor has to 'absorb' enough energy before it can provide its resovoir effect and provide power while the batteries are cranking the engine. So between the ignition switching on, and the voltage drop I would not think that there would be enough time for the capacitor to charge up. Typically a capacitor this capacious would be used very close to an amp to provide a little extra when the amp is drawing peak loads.

                              Interesting thought though. I'll have to think about that some more. If it could be workable, it would certainly be a cost effective solution.
                              .//Daren
                              (Epia M10000/C134) (C137/MII 10000) Liliput /Opus 150W/DVD/512MB/80GB/Hummer H1
                              MediaCar/CoPilot7/Routis

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