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80W Opus PSU, Did I screw up?

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  • 80W Opus PSU, Did I screw up?

    I guess I didnt put quite as much research as I thought I had into this.

    I bought the Opus 80W 12V/5V PSU, but it doesnt have an ATX connector. Is it possible for me to power an Epia V8000A off this, or do I have to get one with with ATX connector?
    So Steve, how fast is your car?

    Oh, about 1800mhz.

  • #2
    You'll either need to swap it for an OPUS that has an ATX connector, or, use the 80 Watt one in conjunction with a DC-DC power board that requires 12V input.

    A DC-DC board like this one would be fine:


    : Jetway J7F2 1.5Ghz Mainboard : Cubid 3688 : CarNetix CNX-P1260 :
    : Netgear 802.11g PCMCIA : 2 x LinITX 7" Screens :
    : BU353 USB GPS Mouse : Panasonic UJ845 DVDRW :

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    • #3
      use the 80 Watt one in conjunction with a DC-DC power board that requires 12V input.
      Shame on you Curly Cat. The Opus 80W can only provide 3.3 amps at +12V...

      Now the CarNetix P1290...
      MikeH

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      • #4
        Is there any way around this?

        Or do I have to mail it back, take a %15 restocking fee and buy the Opus 120?
        So Steve, how fast is your car?

        Oh, about 1800mhz.

        Comment


        • #5
          How can it not have an ATX connector?
          Renault Megane...the OEM look

          The Lost in Europe Ford Escort

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Cris
            How can it not have an ATX connector?
            http://www.mp3car.com/store/product_...ea82123f86d415
            So Steve, how fast is your car?

            Oh, about 1800mhz.

            Comment


            • #7
              1 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC
              2 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC
              3 COM Black Ground
              4 5V Red +5 VDC
              5 COM Black Ground
              6 5V Red +5 VDC
              7 COM Black Ground
              8 PWR_OK Gray Power Ok (+5V & +3.3V is ok)
              9 5VSB Purple +5 VDC Standby Voltage (max 10mA)
              10 12V Yellow +12 VDC
              11 3.3V Orange +3.3 VDC
              12 -12V Blue -12 VDC
              13 COM Black Ground
              14 /PS_ON Green Power Supply On (active low)
              15 COM Black Ground
              16 COM Black Ground
              17 COM Black Ground
              18 -5V White -5 VDC
              19 5V Red +5 VDC
              20 5V Red +5 VDC

              Pinout of the ATX connector.

              The only thing I see a problem with is the 3.3V. Now, theoretically, couldn't I just drop in a resistor or a voltage regulator to drop down a 5V line to a 3.3V line?

              At the highest power consumption, the board takes 2.7A on the 3.3V rail and 2.3A on the 5V rail. The PSU can deliver up to 8A on the 5V rail. So, if I'm using 5A for the Motherboard, that leaves 3A for the HD and one or two USB devices

              Sound alright?
              So Steve, how fast is your car?

              Oh, about 1800mhz.

              Comment


              • #8
                Ack, they didnt even send me the right PSU. They sent me the 12V only model. I've emailed them to ask if they can just exchange it for a different model.
                So Steve, how fast is your car?

                Oh, about 1800mhz.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Splinter
                  The only thing I see a problem with is the 3.3V. Now, theoretically, couldn't I just drop in a resistor or a voltage regulator to drop down a 5V line to a 3.3V line?
                  not a resistor. a voltage regulator maybe, but a 3.3 vreg may need like 6+ volts. also assuming you are talking about those little IC vregs i dont think they source very much current (1a or so)... none of this is fact, just my 1AM off the top of the head response.. but im pretty darn sure sticking in 2 resistors to make a voltage divider isnt going to cut it because as soon as you connect a load to your 3.3v source it is no longer a 3.3v source. i think you can add an opamp to a vdivider circuit and connect it in such a way that it maintains the 3.3v.. i forgot what that circuit looks like though.

                  okay enough showing off my electrical expertise

                  goodnight.
                  B Smoov
                  Project Status: 90% Complete

                  Next Step: TIVO for Radio

                  Ampie Case :: MII10000 Mobo :: M1-ATX PSU :: 512MB RAM :: 2.5" HD, 60GB, 5400rpm, 16MB Buffer :: DWW-700H :: Centrafuse

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                  • #10
                    MP3Car is replacing it for me.

                    Great guys, I wish more online computer stores were like them
                    So Steve, how fast is your car?

                    Oh, about 1800mhz.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Besides being OOS anyway, there really should be a note on there. Most people wouldn't get confused, but I could see how some would. "Note: This power supply is not designed to directly power an ATX motherboard."

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ddn
                        Besides being OOS anyway, there really should be a note on there. Most people wouldn't get confused, but I could see how some would. "Note: This power supply is not designed to directly power an ATX motherboard."
                        what exactly is it supposed to power?

                        +5V 8A Max, 10A Peak
                        +12V 3.3A Max, 4A Peak

                        its not designed to be run through a 12v regulator thats for sure
                        Signature: [==||========] 20% complete

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ddn
                          Besides being OOS anyway, there really should be a note on there. Most people wouldn't get confused, but I could see how some would. "Note: This power supply is not designed to directly power an ATX motherboard."
                          THanks for the sarcasm, but I wasn't blaming them for my mistake. I came right out and said I screwed up.

                          Im sure sometime, perhaps long, long ago, even you made a stupid mistake.
                          So Steve, how fast is your car?

                          Oh, about 1800mhz.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            What you bought is a DC-DC Point Of Load (POL) Power supply NOT a DC-DC ATX Power Supply.
                            POL is use to share the load of the "weak" main ATX PSU by use it to power HD, Optical drive.
                            2004 Matrix XR A7N8X-VM/400 AMD XP-M 2500+, DS-ATX
                            89 Supra Turbo P3 [email protected]/Abit BE6 II, Alpine M-BUS Car2PC.
                            Y2K Accord Dell GX150
                            RoadRunner is the best FE PERIOD
                            EmoRebellion is a SCAMMER

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by MatrixPC
                              What you bought is a DC-DC Point Of Load (POL) Power supply NOT a DC-DC ATX Power Supply.
                              POL is use to share the load of the "weak" main ATX PSU by use it to power HD, Optical drive.
                              I just ordered the OPUS 120w ATX psu. Hopefully everything will turn out fine now
                              So Steve, how fast is your car?

                              Oh, about 1800mhz.

                              Comment

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