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Need HD Electromechanical Relay

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  • Need HD Electromechanical Relay

    I am looking for a relay with coil voltage 12 volts and contact rating between 70-100 Amps. Any switch function would be fine. (SPDT, DPDT)
    No fellows, I didn’t make a mistake—it’s 70-100 Amps of pure juice.
    Maximum current rating that I have found so far is around 30 A. My power circuit is over 60 Amps.
    I am planning to use more stuff than just a computer, so I need heavy-duty relay to hold so many loads.
    Maestro MP3 player: MIS K7T Pro-2A, AMD 1.2GHz, RAM 640MB, 80G HD; Screen: Datalux 10.4 VGA; Head Unit: Kenwood Z727; RF control ON/OFF/RESET

  • #2
    Why not use multiple relays? then use one small relay to control those relays.
    I cheat, I own an empeg.
    Meskimen's Law: There's never time to do it right, but there's always time to do it over.
    http://civic.mp3car.com

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    • #3
      Can you be more specific?
      Maestro MP3 player: MIS K7T Pro-2A, AMD 1.2GHz, RAM 640MB, 80G HD; Screen: Datalux 10.4 VGA; Head Unit: Kenwood Z727; RF control ON/OFF/RESET

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      • #4
        Ok. So you have 60 amps of stuff you want to power.. More than one load I'm assuming? Computer, Amps, Lights, whatever..

        So you get a few 30 amp relays and then a smaller relay.

        hook up all the relays

        attach them to the devices you want to power (something like one relay to computer inverter/psu, one to amp)

        then connect all the switch leads of the relays to the smaller relay and the switch lead on that to a switch



        may not be the best way.. but sounds good in my head.
        I cheat, I own an empeg.
        Meskimen's Law: There's never time to do it right, but there's always time to do it over.
        http://civic.mp3car.com

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        • #5
          You´re not using it on a car, are you?
          70A x 14V = 980 watts!! Not even on a truck!
          It´s lot of juice...

          mpt
          mpt

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          • #6
            MPT has a good point. Most cars have 60 amp alternators--which in addition to the stuff you are running also has to power your lights, fuel pump, and ECU (if your car has one). it also has to charge your battery, so dont say "oh, i'll just get a second battery"

            My truck has a 110-amp alternator, and I wouldn't dare try to run 60 amps of accessories
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            • #7
              Ok forget about the multiple relays, its possible using them but usually they will get hot and be come unreliable. The solution is using a solonide fome the starter motor of the car. It takes around 0.5 amps to operate but can be used to switch circuts well over 100amps.
              I have my mp3car computer on 24 hours ( its not only a mp3 car but it also controls whole car) as im using two batteries and if i want to use the second battery to start the car in case the first one gone flat im using the solonide to switch it in to the power rail of the car.
              There is your solution.
              Fosgate

              System Comp V3 - In progress.
              Low power MB with C7 CPU, DC-DC PSU, car ECU link, USB TV, GPS, 7" TFT, Wireless, Voice.

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              • #8
                Mmmm, good idea.. Didn't think of that..



                Well there are high current Altenators.. the one i can get for my civic pushes like 150 amps.. so i'm sure you can get one for just about anything else.

                Stinger's High Output Alternators for Honda Vehicles
                I cheat, I own an empeg.
                Meskimen's Law: There's never time to do it right, but there's always time to do it over.
                http://civic.mp3car.com

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                • #9
                  My mom's Caddy has 150-Amp alternator. In addition, my Chevy Lumina has appr.120-Amp. I have couple friends running dual 1100 amps in a back. And you're right--it’s simply not enough for 800 CCA battery or 60+ Amp alternator.
                  That is why these guys use special caps (capacitor 1 Farad) to store enough power (energy) for systems up to 1,000 total watts. I think Fosgate and nester have very interesting ideas. Thanks guys.
                  Maestro MP3 player: MIS K7T Pro-2A, AMD 1.2GHz, RAM 640MB, 80G HD; Screen: Datalux 10.4 VGA; Head Unit: Kenwood Z727; RF control ON/OFF/RESET

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                  • #10
                    Hey Fosgate, can you give more details on your relay setup, if possible. Can I buy them in a store? What type? For which car?
                    Maestro MP3 player: MIS K7T Pro-2A, AMD 1.2GHz, RAM 640MB, 80G HD; Screen: Datalux 10.4 VGA; Head Unit: Kenwood Z727; RF control ON/OFF/RESET

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                    • #11
                      Magnum u can go to any car parts shop and ask for a solonoide ( i think thats how u spell it) for a starter motor. Try to get one from Boshes (god is this how u spell it).
                      Ones for familiy cars will do the job. But if i was you i would go to the nearest junk yeard and would pick one up from there.
                      The solonoide is like a big relay but it also can be used as a server. Basicly u connect your control voltage (+12) to the coil od the solonoide, you will also see two big bolts on it, its the switch conection thats where u connect your load to.
                      If doesnt really make any sence i can put together a digram send it to you.
                      Fosgate

                      System Comp V3 - In progress.
                      Low power MB with C7 CPU, DC-DC PSU, car ECU link, USB TV, GPS, 7" TFT, Wireless, Voice.

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                      • #12
                        Starter solenoid, or starter relay. These things handle huge currents.
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                        "If one more body-kitted, cut-spring-lowered, farty-exhausted Civic revs on me at an intersection, I swear I'm going to get out of my car and cram their ridiculous double-decker aluminium wing firmly up their rump."

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                        • #13
                          Hey, look what I found:
                          CONTINUOUS DUTY SOLENOID STARTER SWITCH

                          Continues relays are designed to work with 100%-cycle. Automotive starter solenoids are designed to be used in OFF-ON instance. They world eventually overheat. I am just speculating.
                          Maestro MP3 player: MIS K7T Pro-2A, AMD 1.2GHz, RAM 640MB, 80G HD; Screen: Datalux 10.4 VGA; Head Unit: Kenwood Z727; RF control ON/OFF/RESET

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                          • #14
                            I used to work for Siemens Energy and Automation.

                            We used small control voltages to switch huge loads ( +100 Amps)

                            2 parts come to mind. Someone makes a really heavy duty solid state relay, it uses a control voltage of 3 -7 vdc

                            the other was a mercury relay. they a pretty big, and must be mounted in an upright position ( the mercury inside has to lay in a certian direction )

                            I dont remember if we made the parts in house or not, but I think we bought them from a distributor.
                            Gizmo-
                            Techonlogy on Wheels
                            http://www.hjnetworks.com/car

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