Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What PSU? [email protected]

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • What PSU? [email protected]

    Hi,

    What PSU would you choose to power a P4 system and to be sure to avoid any problems with power consumption?

    I did a power simulation of my system and I need at least 200W, so I'd like to have a PSU able to give me at least 300W. Is there any DC-DC Psu able to do that or do I have to go on an inverter solution and use a normal ATX PSU of a dekstop pc?

    Thanks
    Ste
    2005 BMW X3
    • Motorized Lilliput 629GL-70P
    • 3Ghz Commell LV-672
    • 300G HD / 1G RAM
    • Griffin Powermate
    • Motorola MPX220 + Leather craddle

  • #2
    look into dsatx i think its called? honestly a 3.0 p4 is overkill for a car. i personally think anything over 2.0ghz is overkill. between 1 to 1.5ghz is good. and you can use smaller psus and cases and they are more stable less heat and all that good stuff.
    i got dat ***** sittin on 22s! SUPERMAN EDITION!

    Comment


    • #3
      Total wattage doesn't mean any ****.
      From the power calculator you use, write down how many amp on each power rail (12v, 5v, 3.3v) and compare it to the spec of the PSU. Currently DSATX is the most powerfull one.
      If your calculation required 15A or so on 5V rail, your only choice is INVERTER. DSATX max out at 10 or 12A I can't remember.
      2004 Matrix XR A7N8X-VM/400 AMD XP-M 2500+, DS-ATX
      89 Supra Turbo P3 [email protected]/Abit BE6 II, Alpine M-BUS Car2PC.
      Y2K Accord Dell GX150
      RoadRunner is the best FE PERIOD
      EmoRebellion is a SCAMMER

      Comment


      • #4
        well, you already have one problem
        P4 3ghz = massive power consumption, no getting around that
        if you do choose to go that route, going with a standard PSU and inverter is ur only way.

        if you want high processing power with low power consumption go with either Athlon XP-M or Pentium M chips. They are a bit more money tho

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Nicorolla
          well, you already have one problem
          P4 3ghz = massive power consumption, no getting around that
          if you do choose to go that route, going with a standard PSU and inverter is ur only way.

          if you want high processing power with low power consumption go with either Athlon XP-M or Pentium M chips. They are a bit more money tho
          Depends, I got a XP-M 2400+ off Ebay for $25 and it will clock 10 x 210 easily. It will also easily scale down to 1.1v at 1000mhz which is all I really need in the car anyway. 8rdavcore is a great program for running AMD speed on a as needed basis.


          The P-M are more expensive.

          Comment


          • #6
            The northwood p4s consume exceptionally low amounts of power as well. Though 800fsb versions are hard to come by, they run on ebay about the same price as cheaper prescotts. They're not available in Socket T though (afaik).

            Case in point, I was able to overclock a celeron northwood 20% (2.26ghz to 2.80ghz). And at the same time I *lowered* the voltage in the process. So it runs cooler, faster, consumes less power, and just as stable than stock.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jerico2day
              The northwood p4s consume exceptionally low amounts of power as well. Though 800fsb versions are hard to come by, they run on ebay about the same price as cheaper prescotts. They're not available in Socket T though (afaik).

              Case in point, I was able to overclock a celeron northwood 20% (2.26ghz to 2.80ghz). And at the same time I *lowered* the voltage in the process. So it runs cooler, faster, consumes less power, and just as stable than stock.
              Yep. A [CPU work] / [watt] graph would be best to determine which processor is more efficient.

              My northwood will run a 650mhz overclock on stock voltage (as my MB does not have adjustment).

              Comment


              • #8
                i can't wait t'ill pentium m based architecture becomes mainstream and at affordable prices. I've seen some articles about the M chip overclocked beating the top end desktop processors from both AMD and Intel... and still drawing only like 20w or 30w, don't remeber exactly.
                The ultimate carPC (right now) would be one of those new Aopen desktop boards that supports the Pentium-M chip and a decent mid end video card.
                If i had tones of money to dish out, i would buy one in a hardbeat

                Dylan98R/T - sorry i wasn't very clear, when i meant more expensive i meant price/performance/efficiency wize, altho i'll have to agree that the XP-M is the best bang for the buck when it comes to this. I'm just curious, how many amps is ur whole carPC drawing at full load with that chip?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Nicorolla
                  Dylan98R/T - sorry i wasn't very clear, when i meant more expensive i meant price/performance/efficiency wize, altho i'll have to agree that the XP-M is the best bang for the buck when it comes to this. I'm just curious, how many amps is ur whole carPC drawing at full load with that chip?
                  I agree if you are buying NEW hardware, the mobile version of any chip is more expensive. But I don't know why anyone would want to buy the most current hardware for a carPC anyway. Let that stuff become 6 months old and the price is half.

                  I paid $90 for a used P4 2.66 and $25 for a used XP-M 2400+. The XP-M is comparable in performance to the P4 at lower wattage. Especially given I can use 8rdavcore on my M7NCG400 and dynamically run the XP-M at lower than OEM voltage (I can hit 1.1v on mine) and lower speed. I'd like to compare the P4 with XP-M but I can't undervolt my P4 MB. The northwood is an efficient chip but for several reasons the XP-M is going in the car.

                  Mine system isn't together completely, but afterwords I'll have some system draw numbers at different speeds.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Dylan98R/T
                    Mine system isn't together completely, but afterwords I'll have some system draw numbers at different speeds.
                    yeah i'm very curious to see what kind of numbers you can get, everyone keeps talking about this is more efficient that this and **** like that but they don't have numbers to compare. What you have there is "the" way to go with a carPC price/performance/efficiency wize. Unfortunate for me i never concidered power efficiency until a while after i made my carPC. I'm just waiting for new technologies come along, like the P-M but cheaper... and made by AMD
                    Until then, i'll just have to torture my yellow top batt.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well, if you go to intel's site, you can see lists and lists of cpu stock temps and wattages, it's a great resource.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jerico2day
                        Well, if you go to intel's site, you can see lists and lists of cpu stock temps and wattages, it's a great resource.
                        hey, thats true eh, i never thought about that! it's a great reference but it's not the number i'm looking for. The true power consumption is when you stick an ammeter in between your inverter (or DC computer power supply). That number times the voltage (12v) = total power

                        this is the power for all the devices, inverter, ps, hd, mobo, chip, fans, cards, usb devices, etc... this varies alot depending on the total system load

                        look at the bottom in my sig

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          He needs an ac watt meter. He could plug it into a wall socket to gauge how many watts a regualar psu would take to run it at 100% load. Then minus the amerage of the usb devices and such you are running and get and idea. not the most efficient but would get you in the ball park. My current amd 1700+ 512mb of ram , 3.5" hdslim ide dvd burner and gps draws only around 95 watts. This is great and I have tested the power load on each rail of my opus an found them to be well within the limits. Give that a try.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by jerico2day
                            Well, if you go to intel's site, you can see lists and lists of cpu stock temps and wattages, it's a great resource.
                            Those have been proven to be not "real world" numbers. The same for AMD.

                            Plus once you change frequency or Vcore, all those numbers go out the window.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jcarere
                              He needs an ac watt meter. He could plug it into a wall socket to gauge how many watts a regualar psu would take to run it at 100% load. Then minus the amerage of the usb devices and such you are running and get and idea. not the most efficient but would get you in the ball park. My current amd 1700+ 512mb of ram , 3.5" hdslim ide dvd burner and gps draws only around 95 watts. This is great and I have tested the power load on each rail of my opus an found them to be well within the limits. Give that a try.
                              it still won't give the right numbers, you have to take into concideration of the inverter energy loss or the DC pc power supply loss (which can only be mesured in DC)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X