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  • Read the FAQ. Really need your feedback

    Hi!
    I've been reading this board for a while and now I'm ready to take the plunge.
    What I have so far:
    PC:
    -fanless PIII ULTRA LOW VOLTAGE 1.1V, 650Mhz (I didn't find the specs in those highly regarded "power calculators" though. The Intel`s website says it has 8.3W of Thermal Design Power)
    - mobo "with 12V built-in power converter" (by "power converter" they mean power supply, right?)
    -512Mb PC133
    -internal slim CD/DVD drive
    - 20GB Hitachi Endurastar for Extreme Environment, 4200 rps
    -USB mouse
    Although the AC adapter is rated 12v 5A, but what's the REAL total wattage
    here? 40 tops, I guess?
    =======================AND============
    -IR rearview camera that is 5v, 1A = 5W
    -Xanarc 7" with t/screen, 12V with "Power Consumption: <8W" So, lets say it's 8W, and therefore, it's about 0.7A
    Total:13W
    ============PLUS============
    Wifi Access Point. The power supply says it's 5V, 2A (I really need it, not gonna argue here) + Wifi signal Amplifier (12V, 1A)
    So, the total here is 5*2 + 12*1 = 22W
    =============TOTAL is app. 80 W (90 tops), right?=========

    OK. So, I saw that picture in "FAQ: Power Supplies Explained (Part 1)"
    Battery --> Regulator --> startup/shutdown controller --> Power supply --> Computer
    And thought that I could buy one of those "Opus 150W Dual power output" regulators to feed ALL my equipment. It has startup/shutdown controller, doesn't it? Just to save your time I'm posting specs here PLUS how I think it's correct to connect them:

    Output 150W
    +3.3V 10Amax, 13A pk
    +5V 10A max, 13A pk =>IR rearview camera (5v 1A) + Wifi AP (5V 2A) IN PARALLEL
    +12V 5A max, 6.5A pk =>PC (12V 3A) +Wifi Amplifier (12V, 1A)+Xenarc (12V, 0.7A) ALL IN PARALLEL
    -12V 0.5A max, 1.2A pk
    5V standby 1A max, 1.2A pk

    And although the OPUS web site says that it should be like this:


    BUT IN REALITY IT SHOULD BE LIKE THIS
    Battery --> OPUS Regulator (with SSC) -->PC power supply->motherboard
    .................................................. ...-->Wifi Amplifier
    .................................................. ...-->Xenarc 7"

    TIA. Your feedback is highly appreciated.
    CarPC in Infiniti FX35

  • #2
    Startup/Shutdown controller is included in the Opus.

    I'm not sure that I understand your point about the drawing. It seems right to me.
    Originally posted by ghettocruzer
    I was gung ho on building a PC [until] just recently. However, between my new phone having internet and GPS and all...and this kit...Im starting to have trouble justfiying it haha.
    Want to:
    -Find out about the new iBug iPad install?
    -Find out about carPC's in just 5 minutes? View the Car PC 101 video

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by LLR
      OK. So, I saw that picture in "FAQ: Power Supplies Explained (Part 1)"
      Battery --> Regulator --> startup/shutdown controller --> Power supply --> Computer
      And thought that I could buy one of those "Opus 150W Dual power output" regulators to feed ALL my equipment. It has startup/shutdown controller, doesn't it?
      The Opus unit includes both the regulator and the SSC built-in.

      Also, your outline and the opus drawing are the same, unless we're missing something here.
      Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
      How about the Wiki?



      Under normal circumstances, a signature would go here.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Bugbyte
        I'm not sure that I understand your point about the drawing.
        Thanks for the quick reply
        Well, the OPUS's drawing shows that the OPUS is DIRECTLY connected to the PC's mobo. What I tried to do is to show that OPUS should be connected to the built-in 12V PC's power supply that is connected to mobo. Right?
        CarPC in Infiniti FX35

        Comment


        • #5
          yeah....wtf
          PC Components:
          Lilliput; XPC/FLEX mobo; 1.7 ghz P4 Mobile;512 DDR; 160 gb HDD; opus 150; slot usb dvd-rw
          My work log

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by LLR
            Thanks for the quick reply
            Well, the OPUS's drawing shows that the OPUS is DIRECTLY connected to the PC's mobo. What I tried to do is to show that OPUS should be connected to the built-in 12V PC's power supply that is connected to mobo. Right?
            NO.
            The Opus has a 20-pin connector that connects directly to the motherboard that feeds all the appropriate voltages the motherboard needs (12v, 5v, 3.3v). That's for an ATX motherboard.

            If you have a PC with an external 'power brick' that accepts 12v input, you might consider a power regulater, like one of the Carnetix products.

            It would also help if we knew what PC you're talking about, rather than just a page full of specs.
            Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
            How about the Wiki?



            Under normal circumstances, a signature would go here.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by DarquePervert
              NO.
              If you have a PC with an external 'power brick' that accepts 12v input, you might consider a power regulater, like one of the Carnetix products.

              It would also help if we knew what PC you're talking about, rather than just a page full of specs.
              Ok, I have an external 'power brick' that accepts 110v-240V AC input and produces 12V 5A DC that goes into that small plug on the back of my computer
              The full description is here, but Hitachi HD is not sold on their website.
              So after reading the FAQ I thought that I need a regulator (that "is not, per se, a power supply component. It's job is to REGULATE the power" and "Words of wisdom: You need BOTH power regulation AND a power supply if you want your system to work properly and reliably") so that I can have a stable 12V DC that has to be connected to that small plug on the back of the computer
              Am I missing something here?
              CarPC in Infiniti FX35

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by LLR
                So after reading the FAQ I thought that I need a regulator (that "is not, per se, a power supply component. It's job is to REGULATE the power" and "Words of wisdom: You need BOTH power regulation AND a power supply if you want your system to work properly and reliably") so that I can have a stable 12V DC that has to be connected to that small plug on the back of the computer
                Am I missing something here?
                Nope.
                You're spot on. You do want a regulator. Again, I suggest one of the Carnetix products. The CNX-P1260 should power your Cappucino quite nicely and it also has an integrated SSC.
                The other Carnetix models are the same principal, but have higher power ratings. For example, the CNX-P1290 has additional outputs to enable you to power a screen or external devices like a USB hub or USB optical drive.
                Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
                How about the Wiki?



                Under normal circumstances, a signature would go here.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Gotcha. Thanks.

                  One more Q though.
                  According to Carnetix P1290 manual, the jumpers settings can be configured for various (and I'm sure very usefull) operating conditions, but there is NO single one that would allow a computer to keep running AFTER the ignition is SWITCHED OFF (the key is removed).
                  But I'd like to switch the IGN off and leave my computer running from time to time. (I know, I know - batteries, drainage and all that, but it's not the point here). In order to do that I have to install some sort of a bypass switch, right? So that, say, if switch is on then +12V goes through CArnetix to CarPC, but if it's off - PC connected directly to the battery.
                  CarPC in Infiniti FX35

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yes. A bypass switch would perform that function.

                    However, you could just leave the keys in the ignition and stop the engine. Most cars will keep the power on until you turn the key to the "off" position or in some cases, take the keys out of the ignition.
                    Originally posted by ghettocruzer
                    I was gung ho on building a PC [until] just recently. However, between my new phone having internet and GPS and all...and this kit...Im starting to have trouble justfiying it haha.
                    Want to:
                    -Find out about the new iBug iPad install?
                    -Find out about carPC's in just 5 minutes? View the Car PC 101 video

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      btw.....i was agreeing with Bugbyte earlier....LLR snuck in before my post
                      PC Components:
                      Lilliput; XPC/FLEX mobo; 1.7 ghz P4 Mobile;512 DDR; 160 gb HDD; opus 150; slot usb dvd-rw
                      My work log

                      Comment

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