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  • Inverter choices

    Ive been searching around the ebay australia site and have come up with no choices.. i need to run a 7' lilliput, toshiba satellite 1110, and external hard drive.

    My laptop specs are:

    INPUT: 100 - 240V~ 2.3A
    OUTPUT: 19V 3.95A

    So far i have only been able to find inverters that run 10 - 15V. Even the exspensive ones are like 9 - 15V.

    Thanks

    edit: Can someone also tell me what these are for:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Toshiba-1115-111...QQcmdZViewItem

  • #2
    Originally posted by LowLux
    Ive been searching around the ebay australia site and have come up with no choices.. i need to run a 7' lilliput, toshiba satellite 1110, and external hard drive.

    My laptop specs are:

    INPUT: 100 - 240V~ 2.3A
    OUTPUT: 19V 3.95A

    So far i have only been able to find inverters that run 10 - 15V. Even the exspensive ones are like 9 - 15V.

    Thanks

    edit: Can someone also tell me what these are for:
    http://cgi.ebay.com/Toshiba-1115-111...QQcmdZViewItem
    I never searched for inverters, so no help from me there, but those jacks are just replacement for the jack in your laptop in case those get broken (the part inside your laptop where the power brick plugs into). It's just a plastic shell with some metal on it, no voltage conversion there.

    -psyrex
    Gen 1: Pentium 3 1GHz - ATX - 2005
    Gen 2: Pentium M 1.6GHz - ITX - 2006
    Gen 3: Pentium M 2.0GHz - 5.25" SBC - 2007
    Gen 4: (coming soon: Core2 Duo - 3.5" SBC - 2009)
    ...it never ends

    Comment


    • #3
      ok thanks i have found some DC adapters, cheap ones in US and some exspesive ones in Australia, will this do what i want? can i wire them directly to ignition so it starts up when i turn on the car? And if i go down the DC Adapter route, what are my choices for the screen and external hard drive which i plan on buying down the track, inverter? i know i can buy 2.5' external drives which require no external power, and the screens ive been looking at have their power stated in DC which im guessing means i can connect them directly to the battery?

      thanks for the help, sorry if these questions are obvisious.
      thanks

      Comment


      • #4
        Yes...if you buy a screen for a car it will take 12 volts dc. As for your laptop perhaps you should look up a DC to AC inverter. I think you guys use 220 Volts ac.... I know you can snag an inverter at many stores for under $50 depending on how big of an inverter you need. As for auto on...no...not with an inverter uless you wire in relay of some sort.

        I should have my write up comming soon...I've got a simple remote power on inverter trick.

        Try this link.
        -WarDriver-
        Server Administrator
        Outdoor Nut

        My DC to AC Inverter Mod
        My Laptop Remote Switch

        Comment


        • #5
          ok but dont i want AC to DC? and the specs on these inverters says:

          Input Voltage Range: 10 ~ 15V DC
          and the normal AC Adapter on my laptop says:

          Output 19V
          am i looking at this wrong?
          thanks

          edit: just another question, around how much power is drawn from a stock laptop, i have tried using those power calculators but i have no idea what kind of equipment is in my laptop, all i know is:

          1 stick of 256 ram
          intel celeron 2.0ghz
          DVD/CD-RW Combo
          One Orinoco Gold PCIMCIA Adapter with antenna
          Floppy drive
          Once hard drive 30gb

          Comment


          • #6
            What you are trying to do is this:
            Car puts out 12-14v DC power
            Inverter takes that power (it's within the 10-15v) and converts it to 110v AC or 220v AC, depending on what you need.
            Laptop power brick takes that AC and converts to 19v DC.
            Laptop uses the power to function.

            It's a big waste to convert back and forth (inverters waste most of the power to create heat instead) and it creates alot of noise (electrical, rf, etc) into the system. That's why most people recommend against it. If you find a converter that takes 10-15v DC input and produces a 19v DC output, you'll replace the inverter+brick with a single DC-DC converter and you're better off, but they're hard to find and usually expensive.

            As for power needed, use the ratings written on the power brick or on a sticker on the bottom of the laptop. It's next to the part where it says Output 19v. You want to find a current (in amps) or power (in watts) rating. Whatever power solution you end up with, you should probably provide at least double that wattage for safety.

            -psyrex
            Gen 1: Pentium 3 1GHz - ATX - 2005
            Gen 2: Pentium M 1.6GHz - ITX - 2006
            Gen 3: Pentium M 2.0GHz - 5.25" SBC - 2007
            Gen 4: (coming soon: Core2 Duo - 3.5" SBC - 2009)
            ...it never ends

            Comment


            • #7
              thank you very much, A lot easier to understand now.

              my laptop says 3.95A next to output...
              and i think i need 240V, not 220V in Australia.

              Im guessing that a DC Adapter made for laptops would cut out alot of unnecissary conversion and go from 12-14V DC to 19V DC?

              Comment


              • #8
                There isnt much difference between the 240v AC and 220v AC most (but not all the time) they are interchangeable. If it works at home in a 220v outlet then it will work in a car with a 220v inverter.

                As for the laptop, a DC-DC transformer would be MUCH more power efficient. Check out the mp3car store they have some good inverters I know there is one (CarNetix i believe) that ouput the 19v you need.
                Brown 2010

                Comment


                • #9
                  19V * 3.95A = 75W. This is peak power, but I usually like to provide more power than that to be on the safe side. The only DC-DC converter that I know (there most likely are more products out there) that you would be interested in are the ones here: http://www.powerstream.com/ADC-p006.htm

                  I've never ordered from them or known anybody to use their product, so don't take this as a recommendation from me. It's just something I've come across when I looked up converters.

                  -psyrex

                  edit: oh, right, the carnetix, too. Forgot they have more than 12v stuff.
                  Gen 1: Pentium 3 1GHz - ATX - 2005
                  Gen 2: Pentium M 1.6GHz - ITX - 2006
                  Gen 3: Pentium M 2.0GHz - 5.25" SBC - 2007
                  Gen 4: (coming soon: Core2 Duo - 3.5" SBC - 2009)
                  ...it never ends

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by psyrex
                    19V * 3.95A = 75W. This is peak power, but I usually like to provide more power than that to be on the safe side. The only DC-DC converter that I know (there most likely are more products out there) that you would be interested in are the ones here: http://www.powerstream.com/ADC-p006.htm

                    I've never ordered from them or known anybody to use their product, so don't take this as a recommendation from me. It's just something I've come across when I looked up converters.

                    -psyrex

                    edit: oh, right, the carnetix, too. Forgot they have more than 12v stuff.
                    I'm using a powerstream dc-dc converter. It's outputing 19v and capable of 90 watts. works great for my laptop... PowerStream is great and decently priced!!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by W3bMa5t3r
                      I'm using a powerstream dc-dc converter. It's outputing 19v and capable of 90 watts. works great for my laptop... PowerStream is great and decently priced!!
                      Nice ... okay, we have one (very enthusiastic!) recommendation, haha.

                      -psyrex
                      Gen 1: Pentium 3 1GHz - ATX - 2005
                      Gen 2: Pentium M 1.6GHz - ITX - 2006
                      Gen 3: Pentium M 2.0GHz - 5.25" SBC - 2007
                      Gen 4: (coming soon: Core2 Duo - 3.5" SBC - 2009)
                      ...it never ends

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        sweet, well im on the powerstream website, what model is yours? im thinking 90W would be fine since my laptops max is 75W?

                        on another topic, W3bMa5t3r i was lookign at your laptop auto power-on module, for someone who has done no electronics before, how hard is it to build? and how much approx. do the parts cost?

                        thanks alot guys been real helpful!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LowLux
                          sweet, well im on the powerstream website, what model is yours? im thinking 90W would be fine since my laptops max is 75W?

                          on another topic, W3bMa5t3r i was lookign at your laptop auto power-on module, for someone who has done no electronics before, how hard is it to build? and how much approx. do the parts cost?

                          thanks alot guys been real helpful!

                          The model I have is on This page. The PST-P90W. 90 Watts. How you connect it up to your system is up to you and there might be a model more suited to your application. This model comes with circuit protect built into the cig lighter plug section, so I didn't want to cut that off and just hook it up to a fuse and the battery. So I bought one of the 3 outlet cig lighter extensions, hooked that up to a fuse and the battery and ran it that way. Make sure everything is rated correctly so you don't blow/burn anything up. But like I said, there might be a model more suited to your application.

                          As far as the Laptop Power on Module, it only costs about $15-20usd in parts (parts listed along with the schematics at the link in my sig). and it's actually really easy to build, it's only few parts and little wiring. I have the schematic of the circuit and a photo of the bottom of the board so you shouldn't have a problem. Just plan everything out before you start soldering. Know where and what you're soldering beforehand and you'll be good.

                          Connecting it to your system is also up to you. The best ideal I've seen so far for connecting the power on module can been seen in this post. The only difference is, instead of having a switch like in the photos there, the two wires there would connect to the two green wires of the power on module.

                          Hope this all makes sense. Let me know if I can help with anything else.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            on your 90W model, how did you know the plug into your laptop would be the correct size? Because looking at it, only the 82W model comes with a variety of plugs?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by LowLux
                              on your 90W model, how did you know the plug into your laptop would be the correct size? Because looking at it, only the 82W model comes with a variety of plugs?
                              The adapter came with 8 or so different plugs to swap out. Most power plugs are only 3-4 different sizes, but you could always measure your plug. It'll be in mm and you'll have the OD (outside diameter) and ID (inside diameter). Also, look at your current power supply. It should show you that the outside is ground (negative) and the inside is positive, or vice versa. You'll need to know that too for purchasing your power supply. If you can't figure it out, give me the power adapter model numbers and all of your current one and I'll see what I can dig up.

                              Comment

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