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How To: Power 2 Amplifiers With A M2-ATX

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  • How To: Power 2 Amplifiers With A M2-ATX

    I have a Rockford Fosgate Punch P300.1 amplifier for my subwoofer and it requires a higher power input on the remote line than the M2-ATX can provide so here's how you can solve this if you're having similar issues.

    Tools you will need (maybe):

    A computer to read this DIY



    Soldering iron



    NPN Type Switching Transistors



    Wire stripper



    solder



    lighter



    heat shrink tubing



    random lengths of wire





    refreshments



    What To Do:

    Take out one of the transistors and bend the pins out so they're easier to work with:



    Connect some lengths of wire in a Y shape to branch off and connect to both amplifiers:



    Solder the wires together:



    Cut off a piece of heat shrink:



    Solder it to the transistor along with a power wire. The placement of the wires is detailed on the back of the packaging for the transistors:



    Heat up the heat shrink so it shrinks around the wiring and seals it up:





    solder on the final wire in the car:



    Now when you turn on the computer it should power both amplifiers as well. Enjoy!
    Ampie Case
    2.5" Hard Drive 80GB Samsung 5400RPM
    256 MB DDR2 PC5400
    Xenarc 700TSV - VGA Monitor
    Intel D945GCLF Motherboard
    M2-ATX-HV

    2005 Honda Civic

  • #2
    Nice how-to, but you really should include some detail as to what goes where!

    Comment


    • #3
      There are 3 pins coming off the transistor, they go to the battery, 1 to the amplifiers and 1 to the J6 connector on the M2-ATX. The diagram on the back of the transistor packaging will actually show you which wire is for what, I won't post it here because it might differ between transistors. It's really rather simple, there's not much to say.

      EDIT - I'll explain it briefly here.
      The pins are numbered and the numbered diagram is on the back of the packaging. But one pin is labeled as COLLECTOR and that will take the input from the power supply. In my case it's the J6 connector on the M2-ATX. Another pin is labeled BASE, this is power from the battery of the car. The last pin is labeled EMITTER, this sends the power out to the amplifiers, split the wire and run it to each amplifier. Done.
      Ampie Case
      2.5" Hard Drive 80GB Samsung 5400RPM
      256 MB DDR2 PC5400
      Xenarc 700TSV - VGA Monitor
      Intel D945GCLF Motherboard
      M2-ATX-HV

      2005 Honda Civic

      Comment


      • #4
        Maheriano,

        It didn't work for me, actually I have the base connected to car battery, collector to the J6 + pin on the M2, and the emitter out to the amps. I can test that I have 12v at j6, but the emitter line shows 0 voltage. I used the exact transitor package you had listed in your pictures....however, that package comes with 15 transistors (5 ea of three different types). The one I used was the 2n4401052.....should I have used one of the others? There is a 2n3901331 and a 2n2222a338 also. Seems simple...but not working properly. Please advise!!

        Comment


        • #5
          The collector should be connected to the supply (battery) and base to the switch (amp remote on PSU). Any of those transistors will work. For lower current drain on the PSU, a 1K resistor should be placed between the base and PSU.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks Curiosity....that contradicts what Maheriano said above. I tried it the way you suggested, and it didn't turn my amps on either; however, I think the transitor may be bad....going to try another one. Thanks for your help!

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by crankycowboy View Post
              Thanks Curiosity....that contradicts what Maheriano said above. I tried it the way you suggested, and it didn't turn my amps on either; however, I think the transitor may be bad....going to try another one. Thanks for your help!
              I replaced the transistor with a new one....I guess I am doing something wrong. Before, when I would connect my remote out on the M2ATX to a "load" it would drop from 12 volts down to about 3 and the amps wouldn't turn on. When I connected it as curiosity suggested (collector to battery, base to PSU amp out) and emitter to amps, I have even less voltage on the leg going to the amps now (around 1.2 volts). Any suggestions? Geez!!

              Comment


              • #8
                What's the voltage on the gate? The 2N2222 would be a good one since it's around 500mA collector current which should be more than enough. The gate may be pulling too much though. If it drops the voltage, you'll need a resistor. I'm sure 1K would work well in most situations.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Curiosity View Post
                  What's the voltage on the gate? The 2N2222 would be a good one since it's around 500mA collector current which should be more than enough. The gate may be pulling too much though. If it drops the voltage, you'll need a resistor. I'm sure 1K would work well in most situations.
                  Curiosity, I really appreciate all your time. Now, can you please put it in laymans (dumb a$$) terms? Where do I measure at the "gate"? I'll try the 2n2222 tomorrow. Where do I put the resistor and doesn't it matter on them which way the lines are facing? Sorry for all the dumb questions.....

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Oops, sorry I'm senile. I meant base. Gate is a MOSFET term but basically works the same. But anyway, check the volts on the base. The resistor can be either direction. Just solder one end to the base on the transistor and the other to the wire going to the J6 connector.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sorry man, I wrote that from memory. Here is the thread where Curiosity pointed it out to me and might help explain it a bit more.
                      Ampie Case
                      2.5" Hard Drive 80GB Samsung 5400RPM
                      256 MB DDR2 PC5400
                      Xenarc 700TSV - VGA Monitor
                      Intel D945GCLF Motherboard
                      M2-ATX-HV

                      2005 Honda Civic

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Curiosity. I need some suggestions here. I have tried 2 transistors to no avail. The voltage out of the J6 is 12 volts, but when connected to a load, it is only around 3 volts. The vendor I bought the PSU from has kindly sent me a replacement to try; however, I don't want to try until I know I have this all figured out etc. I have the collector connected to 12volts (battery), the J6 connected to the base, and the emitter out to the amps. The emitter is showing 0 volts, and the other two are measuring 12.......suggestions? Could the j6 just have VERY low current? Sorry if I'm a complete idiot here Curiosity!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Yes, the J6 has very low current. I'd say somewhere between 20-45mA. And 2 Rockfords will use 90-100mA.

                          Make sure you're using NPN and not PNP. When the NPN has volts at the base it will switch on to allow current from collector to emitter. As long as you're seeing 12V on the base and collector, you should see it on the emitter unless it's bad. So maybe something has happened to it.

                          The reason I say to use a resistor on the base is to lower the current without lowering volts. The transistor can pull 20+ mA but with a resistor it can be much lower and still have high enough volts to switch it. It should still work without it, but if the base is dropping it's because the J6 doesn't supply enough current, which we know isn't very much.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Why couldn't you just hook up both amp remote lines to the one amp turn on lead from the m2-atx with some diodes in line so the power only gies one way-to the amps? That doesn't work?
                            Carputer Progress
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                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by we87 View Post
                              Why couldn't you just hook up both amp remote lines to the one amp turn on lead from the m2-atx with some diodes in line so the power only gies one way-to the amps? That doesn't work?
                              The output on the M2-ATX remote line is low, like 200 milliamps or something. And the Rockford amplifiers require ridiculous amounts of power closer to 800 milliamps, I can't remember the exact numbers. So you actually need to increase the current on the line or the signal, though there, will just be ignored by the amplifier.
                              Ampie Case
                              2.5" Hard Drive 80GB Samsung 5400RPM
                              256 MB DDR2 PC5400
                              Xenarc 700TSV - VGA Monitor
                              Intel D945GCLF Motherboard
                              M2-ATX-HV

                              2005 Honda Civic

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