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Can M2 handle Core i3 3225 ?

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  • Can M2 handle Core i3 3225 ?

    So I received a brand new M2-ATX from Chris at Mo-Co-So. He's great to deal with.

    But I have issues (as so many have on the forums) where the supply starts, stops right away, then tries to start again, infinitely looping. This does not happen with my normal ATX supply on the bench. I am feeding the M2 with a 12V 5A bench supply.

    I just want to know if my board is within the specs of this power supply. I believe it should be.

    Intel Core i3 3225 (3rd gen Ivy Bridge) rated at 55W TDP. 4GB RAM. 60G SSD. That and the CPU fan are all that I am trying to power.

    That should be well within the 160W spec of the M2. Right?

    Assuming that it is, does anyone think the custom made firmware for this would solve the problem (if even still available)? I'm at a loss right now.

    Cheers,
    John
    Last edited by jmullan99; 07-15-2013, 07:46 AM. Reason: Clarification
    03 Cadillac CTS
    ZOTAC G43ITX-A-E 2.5ghz Core i3 2GB 160GB SSD
    Win7 Ultimate - OpenMobile - Directed HD - Wifi
    OMMaps + MS GPS Puck - WiFi via LTE Android phone
    2 Zones - Matrix Orbital LCD - Arduino - Build Pics

  • #2
    Just a thought, did you try reversing the 2 pin cable that connects to mainboard power switch on B1 I think? sometimes that works. SNO

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    • #3
      Yes indeed I did try that. One of the many helpful hints from the forums
      03 Cadillac CTS
      ZOTAC G43ITX-A-E 2.5ghz Core i3 2GB 160GB SSD
      Win7 Ultimate - OpenMobile - Directed HD - Wifi
      OMMaps + MS GPS Puck - WiFi via LTE Android phone
      2 Zones - Matrix Orbital LCD - Arduino - Build Pics

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      • #4
        How about setting up as a standard atx power supply and using a button to turn on computer, does that work that way using the M2? I had to do that one time to make the M2 work. Booted it up that way all night then changed wiring to have it auto start and it seemed to work fine after that. I personally have bought and tried them all and I still keep going back to the dsatx (it seems to be the most consistant, reliable, adjustable power supply out there). SNO

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        • #5
          Yes, I tried dumb mode. With and without accessory line. Shorting the MB pins.

          I'm pretty sure it's an M2 issue. Just mostly looking for confirmation that it "should" handle the system I described.

          I may have to go with DSATX but need to try and fit it into my VoomPC case.
          03 Cadillac CTS
          ZOTAC G43ITX-A-E 2.5ghz Core i3 2GB 160GB SSD
          Win7 Ultimate - OpenMobile - Directed HD - Wifi
          OMMaps + MS GPS Puck - WiFi via LTE Android phone
          2 Zones - Matrix Orbital LCD - Arduino - Build Pics

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          • #6
            I've used an M2 with every thing from a Pentium DuoCore to an Ivy Bridge i5. Works like a champ with all of them. The only time I got myself in trouble was trying to overclock an early version of the i3 (before Sandy bridge). That proved to be very unstable. If you run the i3 stock, it will present no trouble at all for the M2.

            I HAVE had a a couple of flakey M2s straight out of the box. Never could get them to work correctly, and they exhibited the kind of behavior you describe. Firmware issue maybe...I don't know. I sent them back, got a replacement that worked, and never looked back.

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            • #7
              Thanks for that. As soon as I hear back from Chris I'll get myself an RMA# and try again.

              Cheers,
              John
              03 Cadillac CTS
              ZOTAC G43ITX-A-E 2.5ghz Core i3 2GB 160GB SSD
              Win7 Ultimate - OpenMobile - Directed HD - Wifi
              OMMaps + MS GPS Puck - WiFi via LTE Android phone
              2 Zones - Matrix Orbital LCD - Arduino - Build Pics

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              • #8
                John, I am using an M3 in a very similar situation and it works fine.

                Sandy Bridge i3 with 55w CPU (Intel Graphics 4000), 120gig SSD, 16gig ram and works fine. I haven't tried it in a car but it runs great off my RS 12volt supply. I have a switch in place to duplicate the ignition switch.

                The M3 is rated at 125 watts...

                My Mboard has built in video and audio and the M3 barely even gets warm after running for hours. If I recall everything in my machine rates in Win7 over a 7 other than the video which ranks in at 5.9. So it isn't slow...

                Also make sure your CPU is solidly in place and fan is secure.

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                • #9
                  It would most likely be the bench power supply to the m2. 12v at 5amps would not be enough. You would need at least 10 to 15amps for it to fire up correctly. 16v to 28v rated at 5amps would work but not 12v at 5amps. So try up the amps on the 12v to say 15 to 20amps. The pc uses the most power mainly when starting up and shutting down but once its running it generally uses less amps unless its doing something labour intensive.
                  Your M2 PSU is fine so don't throw it out. It will easily handle your set up.
                  Keep in mind the M2PSU will run on power between 8v-28v. But if trying to run it on 8v it will draw more amps like 20amps+ to work correctly and if your using say a 20v supply. It would only need to draw between 4-5 amps to run. So less power(V) the more amps it needs. More power(V) the less amps it needs
                  Last edited by pcmoto.com.au; 07-22-2013, 04:55 AM.

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                  • #10
                    12 volts at 5 amps is 60 watts, which is greater than the TDP of the CPU...not that you'd ever likely hit that value. 45watts max at startup is my bet.

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                    • #11
                      Correct. But that's just the cpu

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                      • #12
                        I can almost guarantee that if you hooked the pc to a car battery with a 15-20amp fuse it will run

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                        • #13
                          Thats what I get for not looking at your supply...

                          OHMS law gives us this formula...

                          Volts*Amps = Wattage

                          or in your case:
                          12x5=60

                          This is why people are stating 10-15 amps..

                          Your board is likely using 60 watts during the preboot process or more on its own. When the BIOS is done loading the hard drives are turned on, the USB ports are all active, the fans all turn on and the CPU is running full power while booting. You are likely peeking over 100watts during this initial boot up phase and then ramping down after initial boot. Your power supply is crying for relief before it shuts down on overload. Since it is self resetting it comes back on once the load is removed thus allowing your computer to boot again...

                          I went to Radio Shack and looked at what they had available. I ended up getting the power supply I have now for test purposes. It wasn't cheap, it was somewhere around $100 but I figured I can use it for a lot of things. And it is far more powerful than what my PC power supply is. When you look at different levels of power you should always add a supply that supplies more than you need. This power supply that I have is 19 amp at 13.9 volts for a whopping 264 watts. I can run my HD radio, my PC and my screen(s) off this with no worries. I will barely be using half of its power with everything loaded up.

                          By different levels of power I mean this:

                          Motherboard fully loaded uses 130 watts get a 150 watt supply... (probably realistically under 100 watts if you have 55watt cpu. But for sake of this thread...)
                          Bench testing unit... Should be driven 175 watt or more...
                          Power to bench testing unit should be powered by a source able to handle more than the power produced.
                          Because of the differences in tolerances and ratings you should never match sources exactly to what the usage is. Always over build when possible and the components will last longer and you shouldn't have issues like this.

                          (The above mentioned 264 watt supply running off 110-120 volt AC is pulling less than 3 amp assuming 100% efficiency but is more likely pulling 5-8 amps at full power.)

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                          • #14
                            I don't know guys, I ran my Asus P8Z77 mini with an IvyBridge i5, 128gb Sata SSD and 8gb of ram on my Kill-a-watt meter (AC power supply attached directly to meter to read total draw), and it NEVER drew over 100 watts. I'll drag it out and take a look again, but I find it REALLY hard to believe that a 55watt TDP CPU, ram, ssd and fan is going to draw anything remotely approaching 120 watts. The M2 is rated at 160watts max, which is about 13 amps total, for both the 12 and 5 volt busses.

                            Anyway, aren't we looking at this wrong?

                            1. The draw from the board is certainly within the ability of the M2 to handle, so that side of the circuit is okay.
                            2. The M2 attempts to draw the necessary amperage from the benchtop power supply. Nothing tells it that it can't, so it tries to do so.
                            3. The benchtop power supply is unable to meet demand, so IT shuts down (hopefully popping a breaker or fuse in the process)...not the M2.

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                            • #15
                              @VegasGuy

                              That is essentially what I am saying.
                              I believe the benchtop supply has an auto resetting breaker that opens due to too high of a current draw and when the computer shuts off it is reduced thus the breaker is resetting then the computer tries to reset etc..

                              Depending on what is being used on the computer it all depends on the hardware in the box. From the research I have done I don't believe it will pull more than 100 watts either without a power hungry card added. Or if you try to drive multiple external devices off the power supply.

                              My 260 watt supply was cheap when compared to my computer so I bought something way bigger than I need to make sure It is never a question. I can now add multiple ARM boards, screens or whatever to my test "bed" and make sure they work together. I could even run a small amplifier off this too if I was so inclined although not likely to do so.

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