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  • So, I have this CD...

    The touchkit CD I have for my Xenarc screen has drivers for Debian, Fedora, Mandrake, RedHat, and SuSE (as far as Linux goes). I'm trying to decide on which one will be the most compatible with what I want to do. I have an Intel D945GCLF2 mobo with the Atom330, 2 gigs of ram, and a 320GB SATA II HDD.

    Most important things to me are GPS navigation, sound processing software, and a simple front end. Don't care too much about DVDs or any of that stuff, but wireless internet access via an air card is a must. Edit: when I say sound processing software I simply mean I spent a lot of money on high quality audio components and want to be able to get the most out of them, so I need something that will do that from the computer.

    I am a network administrator so I'm pretty tech-savvy but don't have too much experience with Linux. I've installed Ubuntu and done some basic stuff with Backtrack and RHEL4/5. Just trying to decide on which OS is going to be the most practical and simple for me to learn to use.

    I'm not worried about a challenge, so if it's complicated that's ok, but I would still like as few complications as possible

    What are your thoughts?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Originally posted by ThePistonDoctor View Post
    The touchkit CD I have for my Xenarc screen has drivers for Debian, Fedora, Mandrake, RedHat, and SuSE (as far as Linux goes). I'm trying to decide on which one will be the most compatible with what I want to do. I have an Intel D945GCLF2 mobo with the Atom330, 2 gigs of ram, and a 320GB SATA II HDD.

    Most important things to me are GPS navigation, sound processing software, and a simple front end. Don't care too much about DVDs or any of that stuff, but wireless internet access via an air card is a must. Edit: when I say sound processing software I simply mean I spent a lot of money on high quality audio components and want to be able to get the most out of them, so I need something that will do that from the computer.

    I am a network administrator so I'm pretty tech-savvy but don't have too much experience with Linux. I've installed Ubuntu and done some basic stuff with Backtrack and RHEL4/5. Just trying to decide on which OS is going to be the most practical and simple for me to learn to use.

    I'm not worried about a challenge, so if it's complicated that's ok, but I would still like as few complications as possible

    What are your thoughts?

    Thanks!
    Ubuntu is one of the most common Linux Distro's. I use it because of thie high compatibility it has with other software I intend to use in my car. Many people choose to use a Windows Compatibility Layer (WINE) to furture integrate windows program into their ubuntu machine.

    LinuxICE is a distribution designed specifically for carpc's. Hopefully a new version is coming out soon (ask Kev000). Benefits are the very simple front end that you are after. The reason I haven't jumped on board is because I can't get the right screen resolution or OBD2 software to work.

    Moblin is a super-light, fast booting distro we have been keeping our eyes on. Works only on intel boards (like yours), but is early in development. Something really cool about watching it boot in 10 seconds though.

    Those are the distro's I have been using/watching right now. I can't comment too much about GPS becuase I don't use it.

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    • #3
      When your list of importants has "GPS" as #1, then linux is not the right choice for you. There are no good GPS programs for linux. You would have to emulate it within Linux which probably wont be too friendly on your Atom CPU...
      Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
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      • #4
        Well, I can always run dual boot. Mainly I just want a linux distro to get started because I have all the audio stuff installed and have no source until I get the PC up and running, and I don't want to spend any more money (i.e. on M$ lol)

        I would love to use Ubuntu, but I have no drivers for it. I think I have a friend who can get me a windows copy for free, but I just don't want to deal w/ the BS of a pirated version of windows right now

        hmm...

        Comment


        • #5
          Ubuntu is basically an ungeekified version of Debian. Try the Debian drivers with Ubuntu and see if it works. It's not like you need to pay for the OS or anything.

          Centos is free RedHat without the insane upgrade cycle of Fedora.

          Of the two (Centos vs Ubuntu) I prefer Centos. YMMV

          If you don't care about turn-by-turn navigation gpsdrive is perfectly fine.

          HTH
          My stagnant project

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          • #6
            Navit is another GPS program for Linux.
            Ampie Case
            2.5" Hard Drive 80GB Samsung 5400RPM
            256 MB DDR2 PC5400
            Xenarc 700TSV - VGA Monitor
            Intel D945GCLF Motherboard
            M2-ATX-HV

            2005 Honda Civic

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ThePistonDoctor View Post
              Well, I can always run dual boot. Mainly I just want a linux distro to get started because I have all the audio stuff installed and have no source until I get the PC up and running, and I don't want to spend any more money (i.e. on M$ lol)

              I would love to use Ubuntu, but I have no drivers for it. I think I have a friend who can get me a windows copy for free, but I just don't want to deal w/ the BS of a pirated version of windows right now

              hmm...
              What driver's do you need? Your setup works with ubuntu out of the box. The only drivers you will need is to calibrate your touchscreen. I think they are the egalax driver which can be found easily online.

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              • #8
                Sorry, I should have clarified, I just need the drivers for the touchscreen. Obviously that's an integral part so I'm limiting my OS choices to what I have drivers for. The Ubuntu might work w/ the Debian drivers...just getting a general idea of which OS people prefer that's all

                Thanks for the tips so far!

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                • #9
                  I think with the latest ubuntu all drivers are installed. You might have to do an sudo apt-get install xserver-xorg-input-evtouch. Other than that you just have to run calibrate_touchscreen and you should be all set.
                  My carputer project

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                  • #10
                    Wait, so the OSes have touchscreen drivers built in? Is this Touchkit software pretty standard for all touchscreens? I have a Xenarc

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Linux drivers are not like windows drivers- a LOT of stuff comes with most of the common distros, and that often includes a touchscreen module (driver.)
                      How well the module works is often another story.

                      And touchscreens can be a pita to get working properly.

                      I don't use Ubuntu, nor have I had success with touchkit or egalax, two of the most commonly used modules for touchscreens. Others have, apparently.

                      The drivers I generally use are from touch-base. Some cost money, but so far I have gotten quite a few that work on Lilliput and Xenarc touchscreens free.

                      All off that said, I do not currently have my 800x480 native res screen working properly with Intel 950gma video.

                      I DO have a solution for you as far as GPS though:
                      wine.

                      There are windows GPS/Nav apps that work just fine running under wine with a little bit of work.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Maheriano View Post
                        Navit is another GPS program for Linux.
                        +1. navit is good *enough* for most uses (general gps locating, routing, bookmarks, map support, etc)

                        Tk1toaster need to try the latest navit out. It's improved a lot in the last few months.
                        Former author of LinuxICE, nghost, nobdy.
                        Current author of Automotive Message Broker (AMB).
                        Works on Tizen IVI. Does not represent anyone or anything but himself.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by kev000 View Post
                          +1. navit is good *enough* for most uses (general gps locating, routing, bookmarks, map support, etc)

                          Tk1toaster need to try the latest navit out. It's improved a lot in the last few months.
                          I'm trying to download it now, does it require compiling or is there a .deb? I'm still having compiling issues, my machine hates me. Same reason I haven't been able to run OpenIce yet.
                          Ampie Case
                          2.5" Hard Drive 80GB Samsung 5400RPM
                          256 MB DDR2 PC5400
                          Xenarc 700TSV - VGA Monitor
                          Intel D945GCLF Motherboard
                          M2-ATX-HV

                          2005 Honda Civic

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for all the awesome replies guys, I bookmarked this thread for when I'm ready to start actually installing stuff...probably next week!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I've been playing with RoadNav (for GPS use) and it seems okay, though I have yet to test it out on the road... anybody have input on this program?

                              And yes, just using Linux is a challenge when you want to do something "different" with it. However, I've always felt the plusses outweigh the negatives, and so far I've had pretty good success with it. I use Ubuntu as well, though I have used most other distros at one point or another.

                              As for the touchscreen drivers, try to get it to work with the built-in drivers first, as they are generally stable (but usually lack some configuration options). If that doesn't work, you can install the Debian packages on the driver CD, and try those. Good luck!
                              FunkyStickman on Youtube
                              PoshBoxMods.com (my computer blog)

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