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Latest (for now) Linux kernel on Epia M10k

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  • Latest (for now) Linux kernel on Epia M10k

    Been away for a while; thought I'd announce my return with a contribution to the Linux folks out there who've been having problems finding the latest 'n greatest OS kernel for their machine.

    I use this kernel on my desktop as well (minus the "viafb" patch), in case you're wondering why I've crammed so much into it.

    "atlas" is the hostname of my carpc, again, in case you're wondering.

    I've removed "Win4Lin" from the SWSUSP2 patch(es) and "FBSplash" from the CKO patch, since the two conflicted, giving me much heartburn, and I've yet to find a use for them.

    Latest patch (as I see it), against vanilla linux-2.6.11:
    patch-2.6.11_to_2.6.11.10-jlb-r2-atlas.bz2

    from "bzcat $patch | head -n 13":
    Code:
    base: linux-2.6.11.9
    diff'ed against: linux-2.6.11
    patches applied (location):
            general:
                    patch-2.6.11.9-cko5-no_fbsplash.bz2 (http://kem.p.lodz.pl/~peter/cko/)
                    patch-2.6.11-cko5-swsusp-fix.bz2 (")
                    patch-2.6.11.9-loop_aes-3.0c.bz2 (http://loop-aes.sourceforge.net/loop-AES/)
                    patch-2.6.11.9-swsusp2_2.1.8-no_win4lin.bz2 (http://www.suspend2.net/)
                    patch-2.6.11-ck7_to_2.6.11-ck8.bz2 (http://members.optusnet.com.au/ckolivas/kernel/)
                    patch-2.6.11.9_to_2.6.11.10.bz2 (http://kernel.org/)
                    patch-2.6.11-usbhid_update.bz2 (http://www.linux-gamers.net/modules/...p?articleid=62)
            epia-specific:
                    viafb_03.diff.bz2 (http://www.epiawiki.org/wiki/tiki-index.php)
    My current config for this kernel:
    config-2.6.11.10-jlb-r2-atlas-1.2.bz2

    Rational comments/suggestions welcome.

    Enjoy.

  • #2
    You should apply the linux-tiny, and linux CE patches.

    They allow you to make your kernel a) much faster, b) much smaller; and they're designed for linux applications like consumer devices.

    Kind regards,
    Chris Bergeron
    Check out my carputers:
    DVD, GPS, MP3, 6.4" LCD Touchscreen, 5" Headrest LCDs, PSone, DSSC, etc.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by bergeron76
      You should apply the linux-tiny, and linux CE patches.
      Hmm...

      Linux-tiny looks interesting - I'm a believer in putting everything into the kernel's source, then only enabling what you want, be it built-in or modular. Looking into it.

      However -

      From The Linux CE FAQ:
      1. What is the Linux CE project?
      The aim of the Linux CE project is to port linux to Windows CE based PDA's. This currently includes CE based PDA's with MIPS, SH-3, and StrongArm processors.


      This (Epia M10k) is an x86 processor, so I'm not sure that this would be all that appropriate.

      Thanks for the heads-up.

      Edit: think you might mean "CE Linux" - looking...

      Comment


      • #4
        No, I'm talking about the Linux CELF project.

        It's a series of patches that trim the kernel down for embedded applications (like consumer devices).

        Having a large kernel with everything disabled doesn't make it boot any faster, BTW. A small/trimmed kernel < 700k will boot SIGNIFICANTLY faster than a 2Meg kernel with everything disabled/loaded as modules.

        It takes less time to load into ram, untar/gzip, and execute.

        In fact, if you want to get really nasty with linux (like Dashwerks does), look into XiP and running a super slim uncompressed kernel directly from flash. When I say 'flash' I'm not talking about CFcards being run with IDE adapters; I'm talking true onboard flash/ROM execution from the board - I don't think it's possible with X86 architecture, though.
        Check out my carputers:
        DVD, GPS, MP3, 6.4" LCD Touchscreen, 5" Headrest LCDs, PSone, DSSC, etc.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm talking true onboard flash/ROM execution from the board - I don't think it's possible with X86 architecture, though.
          It is possible, see the Linux BIOS project. Also, there are embedded x86 boards that have built-in flash disks that are bootable.

          Comment

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