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  • What's your favorite distro?

    I know someone already asked what your favorite car distro is. I'm just curious to see what everyone uses for their desktop. I'm a Gentoo zealot

  • #2
    OS X on the desk, Debian for MythTV, Buildroot for the car.

    http://buildroot.uclibc.org/

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    • #3
      Gentoo here for Car PC and servers (I'm a UNIX admin in real life, support a large site).

      My desktop(s) I run Mac OS X (Powerbook, G5, etc.).
      My stagnant project

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      • #4
        I 2nd gentoo. If your lazy and want the goodness of gentoo without the learning curve, go with vidalinux.
        Current projects: iGmod reloaded (Latest release) (put on hiatus indefinatly)

        Unlimited Internet and gps tracking for $6 a month with boost mobile!

        Carputer 2: www.lmaocar.com

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        • #5
          running Ubuntu on my laptop and i love it. Not as many configuration options as others but the defaults work fine.
          System: AMD Duron 1200+ , 512 MB ram , usb sb mp3+ , Tview 7" touchscreen , M1-ATX PSU , Slot Load iMac DVD-Rom , 40 GB laptop HDD, netgear USB 802.11g

          Progress: Installation: 90% Dash fabrication: 80%

          Parts Needed: USB GPS

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          • #6
            Using SuSE on the desktop and laptops. Although I'm using a stripped-down and modified SuSE 9.3 in the car, I would recommend Gentoo or other if I had it to do all over again.
            Silverwolf 2 is dead.
            Silverwolf 3...?

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            • #7
              Ok, let's see...

              Home:
              Debian testing for my desktop with a Windows XP VM for those apps like Quicken that I really need Windows for.

              Work:
              Debian testing for my dev box, Windows for Outlook and Win32 compiling. RedHat Enterprise 4 64-bit for 64-bit tesing and as a fast build machine. Debian unstable in a VM for development/testing, OS X x86 in a VM for fun, Ubuntu in a VM for evaluation as my work dev box.

              VM = virtual machine
              My worklog.
              Status: VM GTI sold, got out of the CarPC tinkering hobby, but I still think about getting back in.

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              • #8
                What would you guys recommend for someone who's never used linux before and would like to try it?

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                • #9
                  If you have zero UNIX experience I'd probably suggest one of the more user friendly distros with an installer that are RPM based like Fedora, Mandrake, Suse, etc.

                  If you want something that is a little more propellor head, Gentoo or FreeBSD (not a linux but worth looking at).

                  If you want to be an uber geek and have lots of time (i.e. no kids, wife, girlfriend to bother you) I'd suggest Linux From Scratch (LFS).

                  You may want to read this:

                  Finally Settled on a Distro @ moose.ca

                  These are "crib notes" that I wrote for a report I did from work when we switched away from RedHat.

                  HTH
                  My stagnant project

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Vinister
                    What would you guys recommend for someone who's never used linux before and would like to try it?
                    Knoppix. No instalation required, and it has every major useful gnu app on it too . Being its based on debian its also really easy to install more applications (when its installed to the hard drive)

                    http://www.knoppix.org/

                    Otherwise... go to the library and pick up a book on fedora core 2. It probably has cds in the back of it for installing fedora as a bonus.
                    Current projects: iGmod reloaded (Latest release) (put on hiatus indefinatly)

                    Unlimited Internet and gps tracking for $6 a month with boost mobile!

                    Carputer 2: www.lmaocar.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      After a complete waste of time getting my SuSE-based system upgraded to 2.6.13.2, patching it with swsusp2, etc., I'm becoming an even bigger fan of Gentoo (which I'm installing right now). I still think SuSE rules for the desktop, especially if you're doing it for someone else, but Gentoo rocks (so far) for a car pc "pseudo-embedded" environment.
                      Silverwolf 2 is dead.
                      Silverwolf 3...?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by intuitionsys
                        but Gentoo rocks (so far) for a car pc "pseudo-embedded" environment.
                        Agreed. With some intelligent selection of USE flags and portage you can get your fully functional footprint to around a few hundred MB. Perfect for the cheap CF cards that are out there now.

                        There are people out there with really stripped down Gentoo installs in the 16-32MB range.
                        My stagnant project

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Vinister
                          What would you guys recommend for someone who's never used linux before and would like to try it?
                          Ubuntu is trying to be "Linux for everyone". I hear it's pretty easy to use for a first-timer.
                          My worklog.
                          Status: VM GTI sold, got out of the CarPC tinkering hobby, but I still think about getting back in.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'll second the recomendation for Ubuntu. I've been a Debian user since 1999, but the 2-year release cycles coupled with 4-month freeze-to-release delays just don't cut it. Ubuntu, being based on Debian (like Knoppix, Mepis, and many other distros) gives you the solid foundation of Debian, the joy that is APT, a current and validated package set, and some nice GUI admin tools that work without totally hosing the system for people who like to edit config files manually.

                            There is a lot to be said for Gentoo, but unless you have a powerful machine with lots of disk, you'll be burning a lot of cycles compiling software. When GCC's code generation routines can actually generate decent code for modern CPUs there will be much more of a reason to go to this effort, but right now code compiled for the P4 or Athlon really isn't all that much faster than the code compiled for the original Pentium.

                            -p.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by gnomad
                              There is a lot to be said for Gentoo, but unless you have a powerful machine with lots of disk, you'll be burning a lot of cycles compiling software. When GCC's code generation routines can actually generate decent code for modern CPUs there will be much more of a reason to go to this effort, but right now code compiled for the P4 or Athlon really isn't all that much faster than the code compiled for the original Pentium.
                              Counterpoints...

                              If you are running a system that is based upon semi-embedded hardware like the VIA EPIA boards or similar (i.e. slow) there is a night and day difference between running a distro like FC or Debian compared to Gentoo.

                              Additionally, in my experience, there is a general snappyness on my server class hardware (4 way Xeons) that was not there when I was running an RPM (read: binary) distro on the same hardware. I have found optimizing for size (-Os) makes a perceptible difference given the large (relatively speaking) internal caches on Xeon processors. On EPIA it keeps the foot print small.

                              The mainstream Gentoo kernel (non-vanilla) has optimization patches applied to it that helps in this regard as well. I'm not current on what the patches are but they make a noticable difference compared to the vanilla kernel, even on ~3GHz Xeon hardware when compared back to back.

                              Lots of CPU cycles compiling is a good thing. What else is the computer doing in the wee hours anyway? Also, given UNIX is multi-user, compiling in the background during prime time has no bearing on what is happening in the foreground. Re-emerging the universe has not stopped me from continuing dev work on the EPIA boards I have (as an example).

                              Install a stage3 image and set your USE flags. Over the next several weeks your system will be omptimized as you keep it current. Alternatively, install a stage 3 and do a "newuse". See multi-user above.

                              As for lots of disk, NFS and/or SMB deals with that.

                              All this fanboy-ism aside, if you don't understand Linux/UNIX in general then Gentoo is not the place to start unless you truly want a trial by fire. Occasionally portage breaks depending on what USE flags are enabled and if you aren't able to troubleshoot the problem because you are out of your element then there is no advantage to Gentoo.

                              There are reasons for Gentoo to be offputting but compiling from source and slow hardware are not among them IMO.
                              My stagnant project

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