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epia M lvds/ttl support

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  • epia M lvds/ttl support

    OK I have an epia M 10000. Does anyone know if LCD modules (ttl or lvds) can be used under Linux? I would assume so, since it's a bios option, but I was wondering if anyone else had tried it. Wanted to make sure there was nothing weird the video driver had to do.

  • #2
    Originally posted by gentoocar
    OK I have an epia M 10000. Does anyone know if LCD modules (ttl or lvds) can be used under Linux? I would assume so, since it's a bios option, but I was wondering if anyone else had tried it. Wanted to make sure there was nothing weird the video driver had to do.
    My board (an advantech half-ebx board, read my other posts for details) has an LVDS output. They sell an additional board that converts the LVDS to a composite video and s-video signal. I know that the console displays just fine, I haven't tried any framebuffer or X stuff yet.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by gentoocar
      OK I have an epia M 10000. Does anyone know if LCD modules (ttl or lvds) can be used under Linux? I would assume so, since it's a bios option, but I was wondering if anyone else had tried it. Wanted to make sure there was nothing weird the video driver had to do.
      the lvds support will work under any OS. As you correctly stated, the lvds support is in the bios, nad has nothing to do with the OS, and no drivers are required.
      If you need help with panel selection, let me know. I have experience with lvds.

      Reference here:

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      • #4
        cool! Here's what I'm trying to get: http://www.optrex.com/products/partd...50GD065J-FW-AB

        It's actually TTL, not LVDS. I could get a TTL->LVDS converter, but I think it would make more sense for me to just get the RGB-01 module for my epia.

        One thing I'm curious about is the wiring for TTL panels. I've seen posts describing how you need to twist the pairs in the LVDS cable, is it the same thing with TTL? Or can you just use flat ribbon? How about SCSI ribbon (has twisted pairs already)?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by gentoocar
          cool! Here's what I'm trying to get: http://www.optrex.com/products/partd...50GD065J-FW-AB

          It's actually TTL, not LVDS. I could get a TTL->LVDS converter, but I think it would make more sense for me to just get the RGB-01 module for my epia.

          One thing I'm curious about is the wiring for TTL panels. I've seen posts describing how you need to twist the pairs in the LVDS cable, is it the same thing with TTL? Or can you just use flat ribbon? How about SCSI ribbon (has twisted pairs already)?
          True, lvds does require twisted pairs, but only needed for the clock and pixel lines. On an average 20 pin panel, this requires 4 tp. The rest are power and ground leads, which do not need to be tp.

          As for ttl, tp is not what you want. AS you indicated, the flat ribbon is what you would want to use.
          May I suggest a different panel? The optrex you reference has good numbers, but a bit pricey for only 640x480, and 6.4"
          I am going to be selling an AUO 8.4" lvds panel that is 800x600, 400 nits bright, and will include a usb ELO touch panel kit. I am going to let it go for 479.99, and this will include up to a 15 ft. lvds cable for Epia w/lvds module.
          This panel is like the one that another member here posted about, I believe his screen name is giuliano.

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          • #6
            Excellent, ribbon cable should be easy enough. As for the display size, that's actually a step up for me, I have a 5.7" right now. Even this 6.5 is going to be a tight squeeze. There will be a row of buttons underneath the screen, and two knobs and two more buttons on the side of it, so no touch screen (I hate touch screens). And it's going in what I think is roughly a double din opening.

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            • #7
              You may want to use a ribbon cable from an old SCSI drive. They are normally a ribbon cable of twisted pairs.

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