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  • Reducing Return From Hibernation Time......

    My search on this topic yielded surprising poor results so I will just post a thread with my question.

    My CarPC will come out of hibernation in 35 secs (from turn key to desktop). I have used tips from the optimization threads in this forum, which has helped (especially in the area of CPU usage). However, is there a way to reduce the return from hibernation time even further? I saw a few posts where guys were getting times between 10 to 15 secs but there was no explanation.

    System Basics:
    Via M10000 MB w/512 RAM
    M2-ATX
    WinXP Pro

  • #2
    hibernation consists of reading a giant file and dumping into memory. to decrease time, get a faster harddrive to transfer the giant file faster (7200rpm). to decrease time, make the file smaller by using less ram (256mb).
    Gen 1: Pentium 3 1GHz - ATX - 2005
    Gen 2: Pentium M 1.6GHz - ITX - 2006
    Gen 3: Pentium M 2.0GHz - 5.25" SBC - 2007
    Gen 4: (coming soon: Core2 Duo - 3.5" SBC - 2009)
    ...it never ends

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    • #3
      Originally posted by psyrex View Post
      hibernation consists of reading a giant file and dumping into memory. to decrease time, get a faster harddrive to transfer the giant file faster (7200rpm). to decrease time, make the file smaller by using less ram (256mb).
      Well the hard drive will stay were it is. But as far as memory is concerned, how do I reduce the amount of memory? When I looked under the power management section of Control Panel, I did not see anything about adjusting memory size. Are you saying I need to remove physical memory from my CarPC (i.e. take it out of the CarPC)?

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      • #4
        yes, physically replace it with a smaller one. hibernation creates a 512MB file that is a direct copy of whats in your memory at the time of hibernation. This 512MB file will take a while to read and dump back into your memory when you're recovering.

        Switch to 256MB, and it only creates a 256MB file. Recovering then is much faster cuz you're only dumping half as much data back into memory.


        as to how much it reduces your startup time, that's up to your setup. You probably should watch your bootup with a stopwatch and note how long the recover part takes. if the recover is only 5 seconds, swapping to smaller memory will not get you to the 10-15seconds that you want.

        Also, what are you measuring from? you said it's between when you turn your key and when it's up, but their 10-15 might just be their POST+recover time. On my setup, there's nearly a 10 second delay between ignition and carpc startup.
        Gen 1: Pentium 3 1GHz - ATX - 2005
        Gen 2: Pentium M 1.6GHz - ITX - 2006
        Gen 3: Pentium M 2.0GHz - 5.25" SBC - 2007
        Gen 4: (coming soon: Core2 Duo - 3.5" SBC - 2009)
        ...it never ends

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by psyrex View Post
          Also, what are you measuring from? you said it's between when you turn your key and when it's up, but their 10-15 might just be their POST+recover time. On my setup, there's nearly a 10 second delay between ignition and carpc startup.
          From the time I turn the key to the "ON" position until the desktop comes up is what I measured. Also when I timed how long it takes to boot from scratch it was 45-50 seconds. So is 35 secs pretty good, average, slow? Is ther some type of software "gadget" out there that can help speed this up?

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          • #6
            Google for 'Bootvis'. It's a program developed by microsoft sepecifically to optimise your starup.

            When you install it and open it up, tick all the boxes on the left side, then click click trace which gives you a few option, to shutown + trace, standby + trace and hibernate + trace. Choose either depending on what you're trying to improve. If you want both, just do one first, then do the other one later on.

            Anyway you click one of them and then click ok in the box that comes up.
            It then basically restarts/standybys/hibernates your pc and boots up again timing how long everything takes. Bios, drivers etc, windows shell. You can then goto trace > optimise system and it will make some changes to optimise your boot up times.

            Look at the graphs before and after optimisation to find out how much of a difference it makes. It's always been a couple of seconds on systems i've used it on.
            I installed my carpc into my pet Kangaroo, mate.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by NiSlo View Post
              Google for 'Bootvis'. It's a program developed by microsoft sepecifically to optimise your starup.

              When you install it and open it up, tick all the boxes on the left side, then click click trace which gives you a few option, to shutown + trace, standby + trace and hibernate + trace. Choose either depending on what you're trying to improve. If you want both, just do one first, then do the other one later on.

              Anyway you click one of them and then click ok in the box that comes up.
              It then basically restarts/standybys/hibernates your pc and boots up again timing how long everything takes. Bios, drivers etc, windows shell. You can then goto trace > optimise system and it will make some changes to optimise your boot up times.

              Look at the graphs before and after optimisation to find out how much of a difference it makes. It's always been a couple of seconds on systems i've used it on.
              Thanks, I will give it a try. But based on your experience, do you think there is anything left (i.e. can I realistically get the time down)? What are typical hibernation times?

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              • #8
                It can't hurt, it lays out all the startup programs in optimal order (basically defrags your startup progs). That alone speeds things up. Plus it's a good tool to identify what it taking the most time. If you can see that the shell or a specific driver is taking along time to load, you can move in it and try to reduce that specific item.

                I don't use hibernation. I cold boot each time and I manage to get cold boots of about 30 seconds or so. I may look at changing this down the track however
                I installed my carpc into my pet Kangaroo, mate.

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                • #9
                  Its an intresting thread this and one I'm going to follow... one point that I think is missed by Bootvis is the BIOS ( I could be wrong ) and options like quick boot can help.

                  One example where I have just extended my boot time is by putting a vid card in - now it does some BIOS resource check which I've not managed to turn off giving it around an extra 3-4 secs boot cold or hibernate.

                  Mines a Via 12000 so that may be some thing to watch for your self JM

                  Terran
                  My Project Site

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                  • #10
                    There is a way to use less memory in WinXP without removing the physical memory.

                    It is in BOOT.INI using /maxmem - tell winXP how much physical memory it can use.

                    read more: http://www.microsoft.com/technet/sys...n/bootini.mspx

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      after seeing your times I had to go time my own system. I have one of those power controller boards from mp3car store. From when I flip the on switch it takes 7 seconds before I hear the fan on my PSU kick on (all the settings on the board is still at default i could probably trim a couple of seconds here). Then it took 28 seconds to go through bios post crap. And then about 20 seconds to load windows - so around 55 seconds total time.

                      I have a socket 939 athlon 3200+; 7200rpm WD 120GB hard drive and 1GB of ram. the windows xp install is a year old and I haven't ever defragged the hard drive and its about 80% full.

                      I guess for me the most important thing would be finding a way to speed up the bios post. It seems (although I have not timed this) that the bios post does not always take the same amount of time to load..it seems odd to me but i don't know why this would occur or how to speed it up...any suggestions?

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                      • #12
                        There are ways to speed up the POST.
                        - Set all your IDE channels to the device that's on them (HDD, CDROM) as opposed to having them auto-detect, If you have nothing on the secondary IDE channel, disable it.
                        - Disable any onboard devices you're not using (LAN, audio, modem, etc.).
                        - If your BIOS has an option to make it cache-able, turn it on.
                        - Many BIOS setups have an option for a quick boot. This does a faster memory check and less thorough diagnostics at bootup. Enable Quickboot.
                        - Many BIOS setups have an option to Load Optimized Settings. This is chipset/memory/cpu performance, and has no bearing on the BIOS or POST time.
                        Have you looked in the FAQ yet?
                        How about the Wiki?



                        Under normal circumstances, a signature would go here.

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                        • #13
                          Try to get S3 (Suspend to RAM) to work. From my research it takes about the same amount of power as S4 (Hibernate) and only takes a few seconds to both go into the mode and come out of it. I have it working on my HTPC and love it, but still can't get my car PC to do it
                          Carputer Progress:

                          Re-do fabrication of screen [DONE]
                          Add mini-USB and micro-USB power from M2-ATX [DONE]
                          Teardown PC [100%]
                          Add HDMI > VGA converter [0%]

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by fatejd View Post
                            Try to get S3 (Suspend to RAM) to work. From my research it takes about the same amount of power as S4 (Hibernate) and only takes a few seconds to both go into the mode and come out of it. I have it working on my HTPC and love it, but still can't get my car PC to do it
                            The difference is that standby NEEDS power to keep its state, while hibernation doesn't... If hibernation draws power in your situation, it's not configured correctly I guess (keeping USB devices powered or something)...

                            Joachim
                            List of front-ends/usefull apps
                            XTroniC | XTroniC Direct

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                            • #15
                              Well, I don't have anything to measure how much power is used, but if I can ever get S3 to work I'm going to try it. I have a M2-ATX, so when the battery gets a little low, it will cut off all power so my battery doesn't die.
                              Carputer Progress:

                              Re-do fabrication of screen [DONE]
                              Add mini-USB and micro-USB power from M2-ATX [DONE]
                              Teardown PC [100%]
                              Add HDMI > VGA converter [0%]

                              Comment

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