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  • Win7 installed to USB Stick

    Hi all,
    I have been searching for awhile to see if this is doable. I currently have my car pc setup and has been running well for about a year. However it has become an issue lately that when I hit a bump my hard drive will skip and freeze my system. I wanted to see if there is anyway to eliminate the hard drive all together and install windows (xp, vista, 7, whatever) to a 16gb flash drive that I have. Essentially have the system boot from there and not use the hard drive at all.

    Has this been done? any how-to's or guides?

    Thanks!

  • #2
    Nope, it isn't possible. There have been some failed attempts, but Windows 7 just will not run from any type of USB removable flash drive.
    1999 Mercury Grand Marquis GS with: ASRock E350M1 w/4GB RAM, 80GB Intel SSD, Opus DCX3.120, Visteon HD Radio + HDR-USB, PL-18N wifi, OBDLink Scan Tool, BTA6210 BT, BU-353, Win 7 Ultimate, CF 4.0, Alpine MRP-F240 + MRP-T220, RF Punch 1572s, Kicker 8" Comp.

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    • #3
      Thanks for the quick reply. How about XP? or vista?

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      • #4
        Flash Drive

        Why not use a SSD, they are getting quite affordable now, and its not like you need a massive amount of space. It is going to be my next purchase.
        Computer: Rebuild Again! Computer 2 - ITX, FAIL.....back to a real computer.
        Install: In, out, in, out, in, then out, then back in again, now out, back in, out, really getting tired of this.

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        • #5
          how cheap are they? I've seen 60 bux, which is too much for me to spare right now :-(

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          • #6
            They can be pricey but they are always coming down. Keep your eye on the web.
            Computer: Rebuild Again! Computer 2 - ITX, FAIL.....back to a real computer.
            Install: In, out, in, out, in, then out, then back in again, now out, back in, out, really getting tired of this.

            Comment


            • #7
              Windows operating systems don't install to removable media.
              1999 Mercury Grand Marquis GS with: ASRock E350M1 w/4GB RAM, 80GB Intel SSD, Opus DCX3.120, Visteon HD Radio + HDR-USB, PL-18N wifi, OBDLink Scan Tool, BTA6210 BT, BU-353, Win 7 Ultimate, CF 4.0, Alpine MRP-F240 + MRP-T220, RF Punch 1572s, Kicker 8" Comp.

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              • #8
                Are you sure it's the hard drive"skipping"? A loose Pci board will lock up a PC for sure. Just a thought...

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                • #9
                  Win 7 hasn't been cracked yet as far as "Bootable Live" goes but you can use it as a bootable installer (use a thumb drive to install 7 on a netbook for example), I do that all the time at work.
                  XP is bootable and able to run live from a thumb drive but a major PITA and will probably frustrate you to no end.
                  Vista, not sure since it's sort of an intermediary but I'd lean more toward the Win 7 answer for that.
                  I'd recommend Linux, and before you get all up in arms at me for saying that, it's easy, fast, free, and there are plenty of options that have mostly GUI experiences that work well (some even better if you like customization).
                  If you want to try that out, download Unetbootin and go from there. There's tons of tutorials online on how to make a thumb drive bootable with linux (mostly using Unetbootin) and it's quick. I'd recommend the newest version of Ubuntu for a nice GUI and ease of use, plus there's some cool customizations like Desktop Cube using the Compiz add-on (do a Youtube search for compiz or desktop cube, or wobbly windows). Oh, and did I forget to mention that it's free?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by shizzlehappens View Post
                    Win 7 hasn't been cracked yet as far as "Bootable Live" goes but you can use it as a bootable installer (use a thumb drive to install 7 on a netbook for example), I do that all the time at work.
                    XP is bootable and able to run live from a thumb drive but a major PITA and will probably frustrate you to no end.
                    Vista, not sure since it's sort of an intermediary but I'd lean more toward the Win 7 answer for that.
                    I'd recommend Linux, and before you get all up in arms at me for saying that, it's easy, fast, free, and there are plenty of options that have mostly GUI experiences that work well (some even better if you like customization).
                    If you want to try that out, download Unetbootin and go from there. There's tons of tutorials online on how to make a thumb drive bootable with linux (mostly using Unetbootin) and it's quick. I'd recommend the newest version of Ubuntu for a nice GUI and ease of use, plus there's some cool customizations like Desktop Cube using the Compiz add-on (do a Youtube search for compiz or desktop cube, or wobbly windows). Oh, and did I forget to mention that it's free?
                    Free it may be, but how many carpc front-ends are there for Linux? And Linux is easy? I beg to differ...
                    1999 Mercury Grand Marquis GS with: ASRock E350M1 w/4GB RAM, 80GB Intel SSD, Opus DCX3.120, Visteon HD Radio + HDR-USB, PL-18N wifi, OBDLink Scan Tool, BTA6210 BT, BU-353, Win 7 Ultimate, CF 4.0, Alpine MRP-F240 + MRP-T220, RF Punch 1572s, Kicker 8" Comp.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by kegobeer View Post
                      Free it may be, but how many carpc front-ends are there for Linux? And Linux is easy? I beg to differ...
                      Two (Maybe Three?), and yes it is easy. My grandmother learned Linux, and she's never used a computer before. She tried Windows 7, and got annoyed with it. Linux "just worked". But that's a desktop, not a carpc

                      There are a GREAT many threads on that topic, search for them, but the general gist is that Linux isn't a viable option for a carpc for the normal user.
                      "stop with the REINSTALLS, what do you think we got some lame-o installer!!!" - mitchjs
                      RevFE
                      My Shop

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by malcom2073 View Post
                        There are a GREAT many threads on that topic, search for them, but the general gist is that Linux isn't a viable option for a carpc for the normal user.
                        Exactly.
                        1999 Mercury Grand Marquis GS with: ASRock E350M1 w/4GB RAM, 80GB Intel SSD, Opus DCX3.120, Visteon HD Radio + HDR-USB, PL-18N wifi, OBDLink Scan Tool, BTA6210 BT, BU-353, Win 7 Ultimate, CF 4.0, Alpine MRP-F240 + MRP-T220, RF Punch 1572s, Kicker 8" Comp.

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                        • #13
                          Hmm, yeah I guess you're right. After all, you WERE born knowing Windows and can't learn anything else.... (and understand that I'm joking here, so don't go all "Flame On" on me now).
                          I'm just sayin', it's an option and one that I personally think should at least be on the table. I'm not a Linux pusher (I'm personally running Win 7.... with Linux VM's ) but if there is a cost concern in buying a new HD (I think $60 was balked at), then a license for Windows just might be a little cost prohibitive too.
                          Anyhow, I believe Centrafuse has a Beta out for Linux at the moment and as far as "learning difficulty" goes, some of the newer Ubuntu distro's act very "Windows'ish". It's not all command-line anymore... and don't forget Compiz for cryin' out loud! (check out that video in the "Compiz" link and try to tell me you don't want that for a Carputer front-end)

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                          • #14
                            Win xp win7 vista have been booted from flash drives before.Car manufacturer LOTUS have experimented with flash drives using WIN7 in their multimedia systems. You can make a usb flash drive emulate a hdd in the bios(plus other settings). However, they are slow performers when it comes to writing small and large data so it will slow down or freeze and becomes unstable. You would need a flash drive that has very fast read/write speeds which would be exspensive anyway. An SSD is the best option
                            Last edited by pcmoto.com.au; 09-27-2011, 07:27 PM.

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