Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Nokia QML Rapid Development - CES 2011

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Nokia QML Rapid Development - CES 2011

    Embed this video



    Sean Clark from mp3Car speaks with Justin from ICS, who has made a demo piece of software to highlight how easy it can be to develop QT apps. These apps are built using QML, which is specifically designed for creating user interfaces.

    Some of the really attractive features of this new QML is that it has great animated transitions and state changes built into the language. It can even give you that "flick to scroll - bounce at the end" feeling.

    Now, photoshop can be utilized to design these interfaces. This creates a method for rapid development where the designer creates the interface in photoshop and the programmer can then work with each photoshop object as a QML item.

    check out http://qt.nokia.com and http://www.ics.com/ for more details

  • #2
    i have to say after using qml daily for the past few months that it's quite nice. I've already touted it here as the ultimate skinning language. I love how you can write the UI quickly using the javascript-like markup language with really cool transitions and animations and do all the logic in super-fast C++.

    For example, this took me about 15mins of coding to whip up:

    [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Rzxlokirn4[/media]

    Instant kinetic scrolling, speedy animation, fun stuff!
    Former author of LinuxICE, nghost, nobdy.
    Current author of Automotive Message Broker (AMB).
    Works on Tizen IVI. Does not represent anyone or anything but himself.

    Comment


    • #3
      thats great stuff! Some great user interfaces can be made with this.

      Comment


      • #4
        Is ICS planning on making a commercial product for this? They have one of those companies where it's hard to tell exactly what they are selling.

        Looks like tons of potential though. I doubt I'd be able to do something like this in two and half weeks though.
        Should I start shopping for a meego tablet?

        Comment


        • #5
          I wrote this demo for ICS. We are a software consulting company. We write software for/with some of the biggest companies around. Most of our customers are paranoid and thus we can't show most of the stuff we work on in demo form. Especially not a demo where we'd show you the source code if asked. We wrote this demo to show off what we can do with the new QML language and C++. If you want expert Qt Developers that's what we sell.

          More to the point: We don't plan on selling this product, we'd rather give it to you under the GNU GPL. In fact, I'm packaging the source now for download. It will probably end up in gitorious or something similar eventually. I'm worried about nasty grams from Sirius so I'm going to cut out the communications codes for that. Maybe something binary only can be done going forward. That clashes with GPL, but we as ICS can always mod the license for an exemption much like the Linux kernel itself. I'll post a link when it's up. Just be warned because it was written in two week the guts resemble someone's partially restored car. Most of the looks are there, but there are a lot of backend things completely missing or that need lots of work.

          --Justin

          Originally posted by jdwk View Post
          Is ICS planning on making a commercial product for this? They have one of those companies where it's hard to tell exactly what they are selling.I

          Looks like tons of potential though. I doubt I'd be able to do something like this in two and half weeks though.
          Should I start shopping for a meego tablet?
          Justin Noel
          Senior Software Engineer
          ICS
          http://www.ics.com

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks for the explanation. I looked into building a carputer two years ago and the support just wasn't there for decent gauges and control. Maybe things will pick up. I'll definitely be looking for that source code.

            Have you attempted to interface with other piggybacks other than megasquirt such as SplitSecond, or AEM's F/IC? I picked up an AEM for my Mazdaspeed Protege, but the software provided is Windows only.

            Your digital gauges are the best I've seen short of a Lexus LFA, an honest replacement for physical gauges.

            Comment


            • #7
              You can thank the artist I worked with, Andrew, for those fantastic gauges. QML allows you to do the graphics in photoshop. The gauges are completely non-configurable, but creating a new dash would be only be a matter of editing or creating a new Illustrator/Photoshop render and wiring up the back end to the resulting QML. We did the gauge cluster in a day here at ICS.The trick is moving the needles is just an image rotation. QML is based on binding so one line of code and the rotation is perpetually in sync with the backend.

              I chose MegaSquirt-II because I had it on hand for a personal project (1981 Camaro). It was also super easy to communicate with via serial. Send `a` and get a 154byte sensor dump back. Do the other fuel management systems you mentioned use a serial protocol? Is the spec publicly available? If not you'd have to sit down with a serial sniffer and figure it out. There is a skeleton for ODB-II using the ELM 327 serial adapter, but it's completely broken. I only spent and afternoon trying to make it work.
              Justin Noel
              Senior Software Engineer
              ICS
              http://www.ics.com

              Comment


              • #8
                Can I just say that the interface shown there is what I would truly call a car PC front end.

                Clean layout, everything consistant, and things that can be user intensive like swiping is used only in areas where it is appropriate, rather than being done for "eye candy" sake.

                The demo looks fantastic, the smoothness of the instruments is spot on, and it just looks OEM.

                Very impressive, and given this is running on Meego I believe (According to the ICS site), you could do all of this on a Beagleboard or similar (possibly with some of the effects turned down slightly to compensate.

                This is well worth the community really looking at and exploring.

                Very professional, and looks absolutely fantastic!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by JustinNoel View Post
                  You can thank the artist I worked with, Andrew, for those fantastic gauges. QML allows you to do the graphics in photoshop. The gauges are completely non-configurable, but creating a new dash would be only be a matter of editing or creating a new Illustrator/Photoshop render and wiring up the back end to the resulting QML. We did the gauge cluster in a day here at ICS.The trick is moving the needles is just an image rotation. QML is based on binding so one line of code and the rotation is perpetually in sync with the backend.

                  I chose MegaSquirt-II because I had it on hand for a personal project (1981 Camaro). It was also super easy to communicate with via serial. Send `a` and get a 154byte sensor dump back. Do the other fuel management systems you mentioned use a serial protocol? Is the spec publicly available? If not you'd have to sit down with a serial sniffer and figure it out. There is a skeleton for ODB-II using the ELM 327 serial adapter, but it's completely broken. I only spent and afternoon trying to make it work.
                  The AEM is USB, but could be serial over usb. I haven't even installed the software to play around with it yet, but I have a friend who has a logic analyzer I could use if I really want to go down this path.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    JustinNoel meet nobdy. nobdy, meego JustinNoel.

                    I hope you open source your code (if it isn't already). a MegaSquirt-II provider for nobdy would be awesome. I also want to use your qml guages for my nobdy frontend.

                    good work man!

                    Originally posted by JustinNoel View Post
                    You can thank the artist I worked with, Andrew, for those fantastic gauges. QML allows you to do the graphics in photoshop. The gauges are completely non-configurable, but creating a new dash would be only be a matter of editing or creating a new Illustrator/Photoshop render and wiring up the back end to the resulting QML. We did the gauge cluster in a day here at ICS.The trick is moving the needles is just an image rotation. QML is based on binding so one line of code and the rotation is perpetually in sync with the backend.

                    I chose MegaSquirt-II because I had it on hand for a personal project (1981 Camaro). It was also super easy to communicate with via serial. Send `a` and get a 154byte sensor dump back. Do the other fuel management systems you mentioned use a serial protocol? Is the spec publicly available? If not you'd have to sit down with a serial sniffer and figure it out. There is a skeleton for ODB-II using the ELM 327 serial adapter, but it's completely broken. I only spent and afternoon trying to make it work.
                    Former author of LinuxICE, nghost, nobdy.
                    Current author of Automotive Message Broker (AMB).
                    Works on Tizen IVI. Does not represent anyone or anything but himself.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Chester View Post
                      Very impressive, and given this is running on Meego I believe (According to the ICS site), you could do all of this on a Beagleboard or similar (possibly with some of the effects turned down slightly to compensate.
                      I have a PandaBoard (successor to BeagleBoard) and I *think* I will be able to run the demo full throttle on that. It's a dual core 1Ghz ARM with OpenGL ES (think guts of the new Droid Incredible HD). I saw a really cool BeagleBoard Expansion Board by Pelagicore at CES. I hope they adapt it to PandaBoard. I could get a decent FM tuner out of that and possibly access to the CAN bus and the MOST ring.
                      Justin Noel
                      Senior Software Engineer
                      ICS
                      http://www.ics.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Source code is now available. Including the original photoshop files. Eventually I want to get this in a public source code repository like gitorious.

                        http://www.ics.com/services/qtquick
                        Justin Noel
                        Senior Software Engineer
                        ICS
                        http://www.ics.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Source code is now available via a tarball on ICS's landing page for the demo. It includes the Photoshop files used to generate to UI. http://www.ics.com/services/qtquick
                          Justin Noel
                          Senior Software Engineer
                          ICS
                          http://www.ics.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Very cool stuff, thanks for decided to go the open source route. I'm fairly certain I'll be using bits and pieces of that in my car, that's for sure
                            "stop with the REINSTALLS, what do you think we got some lame-o installer!!!" - mitchjs
                            RevFE
                            My Shop

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X