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Thread: H/D installl: vertical or horizontal mount?

  1. #1
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    Post H/D installl: vertical or horizontal mount?

    Ok boys and girls, here we go.
    I've read of folks mounting their HD's verticaly; some horizontally. Is there really a factual reason that one is better than the other? Or is it merely personal pref?
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  2. #2
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    You should always mount it verticly in high vibration circumstances. It keeps the head from hitting the disk and damaging the hard drive.
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  3. #3
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    A hard drive works sorta like a record player (if anyone ever owned one of those ) It's it's horizontal and you hit a bump, the head can crash into the platter and screw up the drive. If it's mounted vertically, it won't do that.

    I have mine horizontal, but upside down. Unless you have a lowered car or a truck with a stiff suspension, I wouldn't really worry about the hard drive getting damaged.

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    I am with Arby, but I am going to post what is probably a controversial point here......If you can't afford a 2.5" drive with high enough capacity you should buy the HDD with the LOWEST spindle speed possible, let me explain.

    Hard Disks are made up over a number of "platters" which are made of either glass or metal these have quite a high mass and when spinning are susceptible to a phenomena known as gyroscopic precession (the thing which makes bullets fly straight and stabilises satellites) when a shock or vibration is introduced to a rotating body on its plane of rotation it "react" and attempt move at 90 degrees to the direction of the force. This effect increases exponentially with both the mass of the rotating body and the rotational speed.

    All this means is that when the HDD is moved in a direction along its rotational plane it will try to move in a different direction, it cant because it is mounted in your chassis so that energy has to go somewhere and as a result it warps the platters temporarily IF the Read/Write head is over the outer part of the platter at that moment a head crash is inevitable......

    Sorry for the long post, I hope it makes sense, I know what I mean.

    Twin
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  5. #5
    Retired Admin Aaron Cake's Avatar
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    Cool

    There has been a long debate on this, and if you search the forum for "hard drive mount" you will find all topics...

    Anyway, vertical is best for reasons explained above.

    Also, spend the extra money and get a laptop drive. They are much more rugged then standard desktop drives and are well worth the extra little bit they cost.

    Some kind of shock absorbing system is also a good idea. Mounting the drive or the player on springs should be sufficient.
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  6. #6
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    Aaron

    In most instances just mounting the unit on springs will do more damage than good as during the duty cycle of an automobile such a wide range of vibrations and shocks are encountered, it is extremely likely to touch on the resonant frequency of the spring or mount itself, so making the vibration much higher in amplitude.

    First of all to make proper use of anti-vibration mounts a full analysys of the vehicles shock and vibration characteristics would need to be carried out.
    Secondly this data would have to be interpreted by specialist A/V mounting manufacturers with details of the unit to be mounted including its mass and operating envelope.....
    and finally the correct amount of "sway-space" needs to be built into the chassis.

    Obviously this would not be feasable for a homebrew unit so it is, IMHO, better to HARD MOUNT all low mass components and just add some kind of damping between the chassis (computer) and the bulkhead/whatever you are bolting it to.

    as an example: a main battle tank will generally only relies on it's damping between the ground and chassis..... nothing else, no damping of idividual components.

    Twin
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    10" DTSN flat screen with Microtouch touch overlay, 233Mhz Pentium MMX on a PICMG single slot proc card, 10 slot passive backplane (3 PCI 7 ISA), Custom Chassis, HARD Mounted HDD 6GB, Rand McNally GPS, SB Live 1024 Sound Card, Custom AC PSU, Jump it 300W Inverter, old ISA RS422/232/485 card, WinME:-(, WinAmp, AutoRoute 2001.

  7. #7
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    You are correct about the physics of the drive with respect to outside forces.

    Yes, mounting the drive with springs would definitely do more bad than good. I plan on mounting the drive vertically with no padding/shock mount except a rubber washer between the drive bracket and a small box to surround the drive, then cushion that box in dry gel or silica.
    P4 2.4GHz, Intel mobo w/onboard sound & video, 128MB memory, 100GB Seagate Momentus laptop drive, Xenarc 700TSV 7" touchscreen, IRman using Girder, 150W Opus dc/dc psu, Alpine CDA-9835 h/u, MBQuart speakers, Infinity 15" sub, MTX amps.

  8. #8
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    I used 4x A/V mounts which I selected with a very complicated fomular based on figures which I plucked out of the air and multipled by another educated guess:-))
    System under development (Just need to fit to car).
    10" DTSN flat screen with Microtouch touch overlay, 233Mhz Pentium MMX on a PICMG single slot proc card, 10 slot passive backplane (3 PCI 7 ISA), Custom Chassis, HARD Mounted HDD 6GB, Rand McNally GPS, SB Live 1024 Sound Card, Custom AC PSU, Jump it 300W Inverter, old ISA RS422/232/485 card, WinME:-(, WinAmp, AutoRoute 2001.

  9. #9
    Retired Admin Aaron Cake's Avatar
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    Cool

    I guess I should have mentioned that my whole box is shock mounted, but my HD is rubber mounted? For what it's worth, I have seen no resonant activity at all. Probably depends a lot on the type of car you are driving. A car with stiff suspension (like mine) will likely require extra protection of both the player and the HD, whereas an average car will probably be fine with no extra protection...
    Player: Pentium 166MMX, Amptron 598LMR MB w/onboard Sound, Video, LAN, 10.2 Gig Fujitsu Laptop HD, Arise 865 DC-DC Converter, Lexan Case, Custom Software w/Voice Interface, MS Access Based Playlists
    Car: 1986 Mazda RX-7 Turbo (highly modded), 1978 RX-7 Beater (Dead, parting out), 2001 Honda Insight
    "If one more body-kitted, cut-spring-lowered, farty-exhausted Civic revs on me at an intersection, I swear I'm going to get out of my car and cram their ridiculous double-decker aluminium wing firmly up their rump."

  10. #10
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    Talking

    Twin: Can you please fix the size of your image? It pushes all the text off the side of the screen. Thanks
    Player: Pentium 166MMX, Amptron 598LMR MB w/onboard Sound, Video, LAN, 10.2 Gig Fujitsu Laptop HD, Arise 865 DC-DC Converter, Lexan Case, Custom Software w/Voice Interface, MS Access Based Playlists
    Car: 1986 Mazda RX-7 Turbo (highly modded), 1978 RX-7 Beater (Dead, parting out), 2001 Honda Insight
    "If one more body-kitted, cut-spring-lowered, farty-exhausted Civic revs on me at an intersection, I swear I'm going to get out of my car and cram their ridiculous double-decker aluminium wing firmly up their rump."

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