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Thread: Cold Weather vs Hard Drive

  1. #11
    Newbie CoolDaddyAndy's Avatar
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    I got a maxtor in mine and no problems yet. I live in Wisconsin and it has allready been below freezing a few times. Maybe try an older drive if you continue to have problems. that's my .02 sorry for lack of better answer

  2. #12
    Variable Bitrate Sh0cker's Avatar
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    If cold is an issue. Can't you just warm up the car for a little bit and then start the system...
    Danny.

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  3. #13
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    Yeah but the hard drive is metal so its going to take a long time to come up to the same temp as the rest of the car.

    Simon

  4. #14
    Newbie Angelica's Avatar
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    I don't have a prices but you could take a look at http://www.watlow.com/products/heaters/

    These might work.
    Angelica

  5. #15
    Self proclaimed spoon feeder TruckinMP3's Avatar
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    Do not add heat to you system. Look for a different solution.
    TruckinMP3
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  6. #16
    FLAC MP3DUB's Avatar
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    I was actually about to mention that the L in the product number denotes fluid drive bearings, which i've never used in a car, but you've alread noticed that. I'm not entirely sure how exactly the "fluid drive bearings" work, but I've used a wide array of standard bearing drives, and haven't run into a problem with them (knocks on wood). It could be the fdb, or it could be a hickup of that specific drive.
    -Nick

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  7. #17
    Newbie Angelica's Avatar
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    Hi All,

    Here is a description of how a fluid drive bearing works and why you are having cold weather problems.
    A normal bearing involve 3 components
    Outside is a cup - Middle steel bearings - Inside is the race

    A Fluid Bearing replaces the steel bearing with a thick fluid. Their are several reasons for doing this:
    1 Less noise (No steel rubbing on steel. Less vibration due to inconsistencies in the bearings)
    2 Less wear (In this case no actual wear occurs on the bearings (Fluid) during use. Wear in this case would be lose of fluid due to seal wear)

    Your problem in cold weather is the fluid thickens to the point that it is causing enough drag to slow the platters down below their specified RPMs. During you 5 minute system hang the drive is still spinning causing the fluid bearing to warm up but by the time the platters get up to speed the hard drive / system controllers have time out and think the drive is bad. Removing power and restarting resets the controllers times and since the fluid bearing is still warm the platters come up to speed within the manufactures specified limits and you system boots.

    In this case heat is your friend (excessive heat is the enemy).

    Your possible cures are check you BIOS their may be an option for a boot delay. If you have this option increase the delay in the winter and allow the drive enough time to warm up to operating temp before it attempts to boot to the OS.

    Look into the heating element link I posted earlier. You will need some type of control over this as you do not want it running at max temp all of the time. You either want a thermostat so it only turns on below a certain temp or an switch (Just remember to turn it off or you end up with excessive heat). This will cut down on your delay time in cold weather.

    Finally put in a switch so you can reboot you system without having to unplug and plug it back in.

    Hope this helps
    Angelica

  8. #18
    Maximum Bitrate owenjh's Avatar
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    Where I am mounting my PC under the seat there is a vent, so it will have AC in the summer and heat (takes about 10 minutes to warm up) in the winter if my hard drive is a problem - maybe you could mount your hard drive in your air ducts lol

  9. #19
    Newbie bradaland's Avatar
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    I live in New England and it gets pretty low temp some days...What I did is went to Home depot, and bought some insulation! I found roll for like $14 that is like siver bubble wrap. It seems to keep things from freezing. I have 2 external harddrives, a Maxtor 200GB and a Maxtor 160GB, boot up fine!!

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by TruckinMP3
    Do not add heat to you system. Look for a different solution.
    Why heater is not a good idea ?

    I live in northen europe, and sometimes we have -30 degrees (celsius) cold. I havent install my carputer to the car yet, but i'm afraid that cold can be a problem.

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