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Thread: Cold hard drive fluid bearing data loss

  1. #1
    Variable Bitrate Mikesz's Avatar
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    Cold hard drive fluid bearing data loss

    With the recent discussion of fluid bearings causing the hard drive platters to run slow when cold, I was wondering about data loss. Do I have to worry about the slowing of platter speed causing the platter and head to get "out of sync" during a write operation and corrupting data? If yes, is there anything I can do about it? So far with my current drive a western digital 7200rpm drive I haven’t had any problems with data corruption that I have had with past drives. When cold, the system runs slow which I am assuming is caused by the slowing of the platter and possibly the head due to the cold bearings, so something is going on. Just curious if this drive is better than others I have used in dealing with platter speed anomalies or if I have just been lucky.

    mike
    91 cadillac sedan deville, winXP, FV25 with Celeron 800, Redant 7" widescreen in dash, Opus DC-DC, Irman, Digital Cable remote(lots of buttons), 120 gig 7200rpm 8meg cache WD hard drive, VI power mobile HD rack, mediaengine

  2. #2
    Maximum Bitrate fluffy2097's Avatar
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    Hard drives are quite smart, They monitor rotational speed spin up times and all sorts of other things about the physical workings of a hard drive. You probably won't have to deal with data loss from thing's being "out of sync", but it's possible that the platters will not be able to spin up enough to allow the head's to rise from the disk platters. This would lead to you quickly griding the head's to dust and destroying the hard drive.

    I have a feeling though that the drive probably has fail-safes to prevent you from doing physical damage to the disk.

    Personaly I'd get a different drive, one that doesn't have fluid bearings.
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  3. #3
    Newbie Cinco5's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fluffy2097
    Hard drives are quite smart, They monitor rotational speed spin up times and all sorts of other things about the physical workings of a hard drive. You probably won't have to deal with data loss from thing's being "out of sync", but it's possible that the platters will not be able to spin up enough to allow the head's to rise from the disk platters. This would lead to you quickly griding the head's to dust and destroying the hard drive.

    I have a feeling though that the drive probably has fail-safes to prevent you from doing physical damage to the disk.

    Personaly I'd get a different drive, one that doesn't have fluid bearings.
    Even the antique 3.5" 80mb ones have protection from that.
    "If the mirror aint shakin, you've been taken"

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