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Thread: Cheep Homemade inverter

  1. #1
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    Join Date
    Nov 2000
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    49

    Post Cheep Homemade inverter

    Hay I've seen inverters wound out of micorowave transformers. I was wondering if it would work for my mp3 player.

    The circitry on it would ony put out a square wave instead of a syn wave. Will a square wave work on a computer power supply?

    Also would it drawl too much power, being a transformer, and not be even worth trying to use in a car?

    Does anyone know any web sites that have instrucions for ones?

  2. #2
    Variable Bitrate
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Yorba Linda, CA
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    323

    Exclamation

    You're probably better off just buying one from the store. WalMart, K-Mart, FRY's, RadioShack, and lots of other places sell them. I have seen them on sale for $30.00 or less.

    You don't want to risk permanently messing up your computer hardware by using a homemade inverter. If you want to work on a homemade project, you'd be better off building a DC/DC power supply than your own inverter.

    And yes, having a big transformer that outputs a square wave is WAY less efficient than a commercially-made inverter. Most of the newer ones use high-frequency switching techniques and thus generate less heat and are smaller & more efficient than the older style units. Plus some computer hardware has enough trouble dealing with the newer style inverters, let alone a square-wave monster from the past
    Jason Johnson
    Yorba Linda, California
    http://www.m2pc.com

    MPC Phase IV - *** PENDING ***

  3. #3
    Maximum Bitrate
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    Nov 1999
    Location
    Sydney NSW Australia
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    Post

    nicksmurf: I used to run my first MP3 player on home made inverter and that was few years back when the cheapest inverters you could get here in OZ was like $200-$300.
    The transformer i used was from an fluresent(sp?) light it was 60 Watts.
    Inverter it self would handle power load of around 45-50Watts but it was very inefficent.
    It was running at around 10amps with computer idealing...
    But then again it did the job and i didnt spend much on it as i had all the pasrt at home to build it.
    But jjohnson is right... its not wourth building one as you can pick up one of those for really cheap price.
    I would personally recommend to go with DC converter as you would get best results using one of those.

    P.S If you still intrested in a schematic for the inverter let me know and i will email it to you.

    ------------------

    Fosgate
    Fosgate

    System Comp V3 - In progress.
    Low power MB with C7 CPU, DC-DC PSU, car ECU link, USB TV, GPS, 7" TFT, Wireless, Voice.

  4. #4
    Retired Admin Aaron Cake's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    London, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    2,464

    Cool

    For an inverter schematic, see my webpage in the circuits section (links below in signature).

    However, this inverter would be really bad at powering a computer.

    ------------------
    Aaron Cake
    London, Ontario, Canada

    Player: Cyrix 200, 32MB RAM, 10.2Gig Quantum HD, Onboard EtherNet/Sound/Video, Custom Lexan Case, Arise DC-DC, Win95 Kernal w/Custom Player
    Car: '86 Mazda RX-7 w/Basic Performance Upgrades
    Player: Pentium 166MMX, Amptron 598LMR MB w/onboard Sound, Video, LAN, 10.2 Gig Fujitsu Laptop HD, Arise 865 DC-DC Converter, Lexan Case, Custom Software w/Voice Interface, MS Access Based Playlists
    Car: 1986 Mazda RX-7 Turbo (highly modded), 1978 RX-7 Beater (Dead, parting out), 2001 Honda Insight
    "If one more body-kitted, cut-spring-lowered, farty-exhausted Civic revs on me at an intersection, I swear I'm going to get out of my car and cram their ridiculous double-decker aluminium wing firmly up their rump."

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