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Thread: Suspend to disk/ram?

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    jol
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    Suspend to disk/ram?

    I'm using a compaq deskpro pc, atx style (sort of), and will be using sproggys 2.6 psu

    So here's the $2 question: will suspend to disk or suspend to ram work, and what do i need?

    when i hit the pwrbutton now, at home, it will go to some kind of sleep mode, should i just leave the sproggy running and put it to sleep mode when i stop? lemme hear you thoughts

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    Every psu has its lifetime... I would not keep a commercial dcdc running 24/7 like you suggest... let alone a home made dcdc.
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    I am using suspend to ram in my car computer with a Keypower DC-DC PSU.
    Vickumar,
    there are no problems at all with leaving a well designed and built (commercial or home made) DC-DC PSU connected to the battery 24/7. That's what you do anyways when you turn off an ATX computer at home. The ATX specification PSUs supply power to the mobos even when they are off (unless you pull the power cord). The current draw is not much higher (if any at all) in STR state than at the off state.

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    jol
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    The current draw is not much higher (if any at all) in STR state than at the off state.
    I also heard that leaving a pc alive for a week draws less pwr than one that you start every morning and shuts down every night..

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    Retired Admin Aaron Cake's Avatar
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    Originally posted by vickumar
    Every psu has its lifetime... I would not keep a commercial dcdc running 24/7 like you suggest... let alone a home made dcdc.
    (sarcasm)Because nobody keeps regular supplies running all the time.(/sarcasm)

    Suspend to disk/RAM should work fine with ANY ATX supply that supports the ATX specification.
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    Originally posted by Dimitris1976
    The current draw is not much higher (if any at all) in STR state than at the off state.
    I haven't tried it with the Keypower yet, but with other atx ps's, STR doesn't shut the fan off. Wouldn't that draw a significant amount of juice? What are the chances of running down a cheap Fleet Farm batt in 20F weather? Are there devices that you can plug the fan into that will turn it on if a sensor goes above a certan temp?

    I looked at STD (suspend to disk ) with XP, but that seems to take longer to come out of than a clean win98 boot (shell=winamp).
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    I also have Sproggy MK2.5 power supply, and when the computer is shut down the fan remains running, would this drain my battery rather quickly? It is a 92MM 12V fan in it. Additionally, how do you all put the computer in suspend mode? Do you do it manually or do you have it set to enable suspend after a certain period of time? I really hate using hibernate in that as of right now, I need to put my car into hibernate, wait almost 10 seconds for it to write to disk, and then shut off my car, which then cuts the power to the computer.

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    All the ATX PSUs don't support STR. They have to be compliant with ATX 2.01 or higher specification and be able to supply a minimum of 720mA at standby. Earlier ATX power supplies or home made power supplies that don't comply with these standards will not turn off their fans and/or will cause other problems or instability issues to the systems.
    Keypower's DC PSU is ATX 2.01 compliant and turns it's fan off. The desktop I use at home and bought last year supports STR too. Another desktop I have at the office (bought two years ago) with a generic PSU does not turn off it's fan or the CPU fan at stand by. The computer just spins down the HDDs and enters a low power consumption state.
    When a computer enters STR it is practically off (turns off all fans, peripherals, video card, HDDs and CPU). The only thing that is kept alive is the RAM, with minimum power drain, in order to keep it's data. STD (=Suspend To Disk) writes everything that's on RAM on the HDD and then turns off. So all the data on the RAM is lost and has to be read from the disk during boot (=more time consuming).
    Keep in mind that even though the ATX 2.01 spec says that the PSU should be able to supply 720mA, that DOESN'T mean that your computer will draw this amount of current while in STR state. Mine draws approximately 180mA at STR. This is low enough to make sure that it won't drain your car's battery for some days.
    If I turn it compleately off it draws 110mA, so the difference is minimal for having a 6 SEC BOOT TIME and all the software (players etc) running the way I left it.
    If you want to be totaly safe you could add a circuit that disconnects the PSU from the battery when the voltage drops below a certain level (the kind circuit good inverters have), to prevent you battery going flat in case you leave your car parked for many days with the PC at STR. STR has the advantage that if you disconnect power this way, the computer will not "see" it as a hard reboot and will boot next time normally without scanning drives for errors and will not cause any problems to the Windows OS in the future.

    An easy way to use STR with Sproggy's PSU, would be to disconnect the PSU's fan from the PSU board, and supply it through a HDD power connector that should turn off in STR.
    JUST MAKE SURE THAT SPROGGY'S PSU DOES NOT GET TOO HOT IN STR WITH IT'S FAN OFF!

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    Dimitris1976-
    Dude. You rock! Thanks for the info.
    I'll test out STR and see if the Keypower can hold <720mA during engine start. It would be nice to break the nearly 1 minute boot barrier I have right now!
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  10. #10
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    PatO

    Keypower does hold your computer in STR during engine cranking. Sometimes (depends on your computer, engine size, battery size/age, cabling) it can keep the computer running (not reboot) during engine starts too.
    Use a tank circuit (a capacitor and a diode) and it will never reboot!
    Read this for more info:

    Help with Tank Circuit

    Keep in mind that in order to use STR your motherboard has to support it too (Supermicro 370SED with Intel's 810 chipset that use does, so I guess all the newest do), you have to enable ACPI in BIOS and finally setup Win98 again with the command line:

    DriveLetter:\setup /p j

    You can do that over a previous Win98 installation. In WinXP you don't have to do that last step.

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