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  1. Hardware Review: Xenarc 700CSH 7" Capacitive Touchscreen Monitor

    by , 12-09-2013 at 02:37 PM

    What is it?

    The Xenarc 700CSH is a 7 Inch display with a capacitive touchscreen input.

    The Verdict:

    Yes and yes! The Xenarc 700CSH's capacitive touchscreen sets it apart from other displays in the segment. The clear and precise overlay allows the quality of the monitors display to shine through any glare. The 700CSH proves that Xenarc has been watching, as it addresses most of the long-standing shortcomings of small display screens.



    What’s in the box?

    The Xenarc box comes with the touchscreen monitor, VESA mount, wall and car chargers, input cabling which includes HDMI/VGA/Composite video connections, a HDMI -> DVI adapter, full-function remote, instruction manual, and a cable locking clasp.


    For a quick video of the unboxing for the 700CSH please click here.

    Description:

    Another year brings a another offering in the series of Xenarc 7 Inch monitors. The 700 series has seen its' share of small changes over the last few years, but nothing on the scale of the new 700CSH. This monitor shares the same physical dimensions as the older models, but offers so much more in the form of a beautiful capacitive touchscreen overlay.


    The community here at mp3Car.com has long searched for a install monitor which attempts to draw us closer to the visual fidelity of today's smartphones and tablets. Like Xenarc, each competing brand attempted to fulfill the needs of the community with features like high-brightness displays and a greater set of available inputs, but each of the monitors were limited by the resistive touchscreen overlays. Resistive touchscreens will often mute the color of the underlying screen and disperse surface lighting in a manner which at times makes it dangerous to use while driving an automobile in the daytime. Capacitive touchscreen technology allows for more of the screen's natural tones to come through and focuses oncoming light rather than disperse it. The difference comparing the Xenarc 700CSH with a resistive model is truly night and day. Check out the following example showing the 700CSH when compared to last year's Xenarc. Both pictures were taken during similar lighting.


    The improvements to the 700CSH didn't just stop at the touchscreen however. The display has received a bump up in native resolution. Instead of the 800x600 resolution we've come to expect, Xenarc has increased the 700CSH to 1024x600. The end result is a gorgeous display that does away with some of the pixilation seen on other models. It's still no Galaxy S4 or retina display, but the lines between have definitely been blurred. Car PC purists fear not, the 700CSH can still display between 800x480 and 1920x1080, PC willing. The brightness rating of 500nits and the contrast ratio of 400:1 are carryovers from prior models, but, because of the touchscreen, offer more bang for their buck.


    Xenarc has carried over all of the luxury features from prior models. You can still expect to get things like auto-switching to a composite input, auto power-on, and auto-brightness via the on-board photosensor. The menu system of the 700CSH is more expansion, offering more control than older models. Options like audio-over-HDMI and input switching control are welcomed additions. The included remote is actually usable, as it allows for full operation of the device rather than a subset of functions. Xenarc advertises that the touchscreen will still operate even if a fingerprint or scratch protector overlay is used. Fingerprints almost seem more of an issue with this touchscreen, but I personally feel like it'd be a shame to do anything to alter the display quality.



    The Positive:

    • The best display quality for the segment, bar none
    • Includes cable management options
    • Rock solid build quality
    • Fully functional remote included



    The Negative:

    • Bezel is larger than competitors


    The Verdict:

    Yes and yes! The Xenarc 700CSH's capacitive touchscreen sets it apart from other displays in the segment. The clear and precise overlay allows the quality of the monitors display to shine through any glare. The 700CSH proves that Xenarc has been watching, as it addresses most of the long-standing shortcomings of small display screens.

    Stay tuned for more photos, disassembly videos, pricing information, and availability on the Xenarc 700CSH

  2. Automotive Computing (R)Evolution - The Android Head Unit Build - Touchscreen Setup

    by , 06-25-2013 at 06:50 PM

    A part of the thrill of using custom hardware is that eventually you will run across an obstacle. The resistive touchscreen that's used in the Lilliput and Xenarc monitors presented quite the thrill when connecting it to the ODROID-X2.

    Upon plugging in the USB connector the initial response is delightful. The touchscreen will automatically begin responding to touch. The problem lies in where those touches occur based on the position of your finger on the screen. The X and Y axes are reversed, leaving you with a touchscreen that cant really be used. Unfortunately, the solution isn't as easy as it would be in Windows, where a simple recalibration of the touchscreen would correct the issue. The driver that allows the touchscreen to operate on the ODROID-X2 is a part of the system kernel files, and the only real way to apply any fix is to recompile the OS with the modified kernel files.

    Luckily I have Googled enough to stumble on an easy to use guide to correct the issue and get the ODROID-X2 working in harmony with our standard touchscreen fare. This solution may work on other Android development boards, but obviously your source files will vary.

    I must note that I take NO credit for the solutions presented here. It's mostly a combination of information found at these two sources:

    http://forum.odroid.com/viewtopic.php?f=51&t=83
    https://groups.google.com/forum/#!to...86/uNo7a39-s3I



    Requirements
    -A computer running Ubuntu
    -Android SDK with ADB installed (I used this guide to set it up)
    -Download the Toolchain application for Ubuntu from here
    -Download the Android Beta 1.6 Kernel Sources from here

    Steps
    1. Open the Terminal application in Ubuntu and run the following command. You will need admin access as well as the admin password as these are root commands:
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install build-essential libqt4-dev xz
    2. If your Ubuntu is installed on a 64bit machine, you will need to run the following commands (if not, go to step 3)
    Code:
    sudo apt-get install package-name:i386
    sudo apt-get update
    sudo-apt-get install ia32-libs
    3.Run these commands to install and configure Toolchain:
    Code:
    tar -jxvf arm-2010q1.tar.xz
    cd arm-2010q1/bin
    export CROSS_COMPILE=`pwd`/arm-none-linux-gnueabi-
    4.Unpack the kernel sources. Run the following commands:
    Code:
    tar zxvf kernel_4412.tar.gz
    cd kernel_4412
    5.Configure Toolchain for your ODROID-X2 storage type.
    If using the eMMC module enter:
    Code:
    make ARCH=arm odroidx2_android_emmc_defconfig
    If using an SD card enter:
    Code:
    make ARCH=odroidx2_android_sdmmc_defconfig
    6.At this point you can minimize terminal, and navigate to the directory where your kernel sources were unzipped (should be in Home folder, a folder called kernel_4412). In this folder, navigate to the file kernel/drivers/hid/hid-input.c. Open this file with a text editor, as we will be modifying a small portion of the file with the corrected code.

    7.Find the hidinput_hid_event() function, and append the following code between the lines that read "input_event(input, EV_MSC, MSC_SCAN, usage->hid);" and "input_event(input, usage->type, usage->code, value);" . You can use the find/search capability to help locate these lines within the hidinput_hid_event() function:

    Code:
    -//+RDG: patch for eGalax touchscreen: swap X and Y, invert X
    direction
    -if (usage->type == EV_ABS)
    -{
    -        if (usage->hid == HID_GD_X) {
    -                usage->code = 1;        // vs 0 (X becomes Y)
    -                value = 4096 - value;
    -        } else if (usage->hid == HID_GD_Y) {
    -                usage->code = 0;        // vs 1 (Y becomes X)
    -        }
    -//printk("RDG: hidinput_hid_event: type = %d, code = %d, value = %d
    (hid = 0x%x)\n", usage->type, usage->code, value, usage->hid);
    -}
    -//-RDG
    (In the event you cant find this/don't want to be bothered with it, the modified version of the file is attached)



    8. Save and close the file and maximize your terminal window. Run the following command to build the modules:
    Code:
    make -j4 ARCH=arm zImage modules
    This step can take several minutes, so be patient.

    9. copy the modules to the ODROID-X2 by running this command:
    Code:
    adb remount
    for module in `find . -iname *.ko`; do adb push $module /system/lib/modules ; done
    10.Copy the kernel... we're almost there:
    Code:
    adb push arch/arm/boot/zImage /system/lib/modules
    11.Flash the kernel to complete the process!:
    Code:
    adb shell
    cd /system/lib/modules
    busybox dd conv=notrunc seek=2455 bs=512 if=zImage of=/dev/block/mmcblk0
    sync
    exit
    adb reboot
    This command reboots the ODROID and should fix the touchscreen axes!

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Files
  3. Free Shipping In March

    by , 03-01-2012 at 01:13 PM

    SHOP NOW


    This promotion is good for orders more than $20 shipped to the lower 48 states.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Images  
  4. Car Computer Install: Wiring The Car

    by , 11-30-2011 at 04:41 PM

    Embed this video



    Sean Clark, from mp3Car, shows us how the various components in the vehicle are wired. Getting power cables through the firewall is one of the more difficult aspects of any install. In this case, drilling through the firewall of the Altima in the wheel well proves to be the best option. Be sure to use plenty of fire-retardant adhesive on these holes once the wires are fed through. Running the power cables to the trunk can be done along the sill of the driver door. Use care when prying the panel loose. A trim removal tool is recommended to prevent scratching of your OEM parts. The backup camera switching wire and accessory turn on wire are also run along the driver door sill. Wires that aren't associated with powering any device are run along the passenger side sill to prevent interference. These include the front speaker wires, an HDMI video cable, a USB touch cable, a USB iPhone cable, a USB OBD-II cable, a USB cable for an aux input, and a microphone 3.5mm audio cable.
  5. Hardware Review: Xenarc 700TSU USB Powered Touchscreen Monitor

    by , 10-13-2011 at 09:27 AM

    What is it?

    The Xenarc 700TSU is a USB controlled and powered 7-inch touchscreen monitor with optional composite support.

    The Verdict:

    The 700TSU takes a pretty large leap forward into making USB only touchscreen devices available to use as primary monitors. It maintains the rather stellar build quality of other Xenarc devices, while reducing the number of cables needed to operate the display. It's rather bulky when compared to other USB monitors, but with that size comes some pretty nice configuration options the segment has not yet seen.

    See the Xenarc 700TSU on the mp3Car Store here.



    What’s in the box?

    The Xenarc 700TSU comes packed with much more than most USB monitors include. There's the monitor, and a USB & composite (2 sets) cable for starters. Couple those with an optional 5v power brick, a cigarette lighter adapter, VESA mount, a full featured remote control, stylus pen, driver cd, and a host of operation manuals.


    Description:

    If you are a regular reader of the product review section, you may have noticed an abundance of reviews and videos regarding touchscreens recently. This is a great thing for the community, as newer touchscreens seem to come out regularly with better brightness, sunlight readability, cabling and power options. As a whole, we've seen a pretty dramatic evolution of these devices, and the Xenarc 700TSU attempts to keep true to that idea.

    The initial concept we've seen before. The 700TSU is a 7-inch touchscreen monitor which can be powered and controlled solely by USB. This means instead of having to poke around for VGA, or HDMI plugs, one (or occasionally two) USB ports instantly power up and display your PC through this unit. This technology is available by use of a special driver suite called DisplayLink, and the 700TSU uses the latest version of this driver to display a clear and crisp image whether what's displayed is static or in motion.


    This capability with DisplayLink in the 700TSU is the best I have personally seen. First generation devices left pictures dull and grainy, and made videos appear distorted and choppy. The 700TSU looks every bit as good as a VGA quality screen, and the controller for the 700TSU actually allows resolution options, again, a feat unseen in the USB segment before. Even at wide angles the 700TSU does an excellent job of providing a quality image.


    Instead of settling for this enhancement in the device, Xenarc took a larger step forward by incorporating two sets of composite connectors. This allows for an even larger array of devices that can be used with this screen. Instead of requiring one USB, the 700TSU allows you to run one of it's two auxiliary power options to the screen and display the composite device, sound included. Xenarc was gracious enough to remember to include the auto-switch composite signalling, so that people who intend to install a backup camera still have that option available with the 700TSU.


    The only drawback to all of this flexibility is the fact that the Xenarc, when compared to the other USB touchscreens, is quite large. That's not to say that it is ridiculously large. In fact, appearance-wise it looks pretty much identical to the Xenarc 700TSV VGA monitor. Only when compared to competing products from Mimo and Lilliput does the 700TSU's girth stand out. Remember though that with those competing devices all you get is USB.


    The only other problem with the Xenarc 700TSU is an inherent problem with all USB touchscreens at this time. They all require the PC to be loaded with drivers to display. That means you get no BIOS, no windows loading notification, or anything until the DisplayLink drivers are up and running.

    The Positive:

    • High quality screen available with only a single USB connection
    • Composite connectors allow for various installations
    • Several different power options available
    • Auto-switch with composite connection included
    • Only USB touchscreen with a full configuration menu, brightness, contrast etc can all be set
    • Resolution options are available, a first in the segment


    The Negative:

    • Size of display is large compared to competing USB screens
    • That annoying wait for drivers to load before display works


    The Verdict:

    The 700TSU takes a pretty large leap forward into making USB only touchscreen devices available to use as primary monitors. It maintains the rather stellar build quality of other Xenarc devices, while reducing the number of cables needed to operate the display. It's rather bulky when compared to other USB monitors, but with that size comes some pretty nice configuration options the segment has not yet seen.

    For more specifications on the Xenarc 700TSU click here
    For a video comparing the Xenarc 700TSU with the other latest USB Touchscreens click here
    For more pictures of the 700TSU click here

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