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Thread: Rubber backed buttons and PCB pads

  1. #1
    Low Bitrate
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    Rubber backed buttons and PCB pads

    My radio PCB has the type of buttons that if you push against them rubber on the back of the button contacts the PCB and they activate. I want to relocate my buttons to somewhere the PCB does not fit, so I need to put something else behind the buttons and find a way to wire it so it activates the pads onthe PCB.

    I am thinking I can solder extension wires onto the PCB where the button pads are, then buy some mini push switches to relocate behind the buttons. Will this work or am I missing something with how these PCB pad buttons work?

    Sorry if this is in the wrong section, seemed like the most appropriate.

  2. #2
    Low Bitrate hakhawk's Avatar
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    yep, just solder extension wires and new buttons of your choice as you said.

    the rubber pads are just a conductive carbon pad or something on them.


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  3. #3
    Constant Bitrate
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    The only time this wouldn't work for you is if the buttons were actually analog (like Xbox and PS2 controllers) they can sense how hard you press the button. They look the same as the buttons you are dealing with, but are made of a different material in a squishy convex(?) shape. The harder you press, the more surface area is covered and the less the resistance.

    But, I am just rambling, because it is unlikely you will encounter those types much in carpcs.

    Scott McDonnell

  4. #4
    Variable Bitrate
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    There is another small possibility that may bite you later on. Those carbon-loaded rubber pads have a pretty high resistance, and if you use an off-the-shelf pushbutton it will likely be a lot lower. Depending on how they set the buttons up, this may allow too much current to flow through the switches and burn up the sensing circuit. It will most likely be fine, but if you're really concerned, try to measure the "on" resistance of the original switches and just match that using a serial resistor when you install the new push button.
    MII-12000 / Ampie / Lilliput 7" / BU-355 / PicoPSU / uSDC
    Currently: Enjoying the setup, but always contemplating my next move...

  5. #5
    Low Bitrate MATRIXSHARK's Avatar
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    Do yourself a favor and follow the cicuit traces. DON'T try and solder to where the old buttons actually are. Just follow the "flow" of current and complete the circuit somewhere that is easier to solder to.
    2000 Acura Integra Type-R
    Progress = 99% ---> Check it out:
    http://www.matrixshark.com/carputer.htm

  6. #6
    Constant Bitrate
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