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Thread: Jump Lilliput on/off switch

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    Low Bitrate Crav4Speed's Avatar
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    Jump Lilliput on/off switch

    I saw a thread where someone actually soldered a wire from one side to the other side of the on/off switch. But I was wondering if the whole board could be completely removed and try to jump the on/off from the ribbon wire or somewhere internally. Is it possible? this way, it somes on and off directly from ignition.

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    Maximum Bitrate Altimat's Avatar
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    The switch still needs to be momentarily closed to turn it on or off, even if you power it from the ignition (unless you use the remote). I have a small reed relay on my ITPS switched (logic low) output, and I use the momentary switch closure to turn on/off both my Lilliput and my laptop. I think this is an excellent application for the ITPS when you own a Lilliput. If you already have a PSU, you can distribute the load by running the Lilliput and an external DVD drive from the ITPS 12V output and limit the load on your PSU to your CPU/HDD etc.
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    FLAC shakes's Avatar
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    i haven't studied the schematic (nor seen one) for the lilliput ... but everything i know says logically you should be able to short the 2 lines that are fed to the power button and get the same results. you could do this on the ribbon or in the connector itself.

    supposedly if the power button is shorted then the lilliput is turned on once power is supplied ... however i hear this makes all the other buttons (like menu) unusable (even via remote)

    something to think about
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    Low Bitrate Crav4Speed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by shakes
    i haven't studied the schematic (nor seen one) for the lilliput ... but everything i know says logically you should be able to short the 2 lines that are fed to the power button and get the same results. you could do this on the ribbon or in the connector itself.

    supposedly if the power button is shorted then the lilliput is turned on once power is supplied ... however i hear this makes all the other buttons (like menu) unusable (even via remote)

    something to think about
    Well, what I really want is to get rid of the pcb with all the buttons on it. I don't need the osd and the volume so why have the buttons there? What I want to know is how I could jump the on/off switch either from the ribbon cable or the internal connector so I can throw those buttons out

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    Low Bitrate Crav4Speed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Altimat
    The switch still needs to be momentarily closed to turn it on or off, even if you power it from the ignition (unless you use the remote). I have a small reed relay on my ITPS switched (logic low) output, and I use the momentary switch closure to turn on/off both my Lilliput and my laptop. I think this is an excellent application for the ITPS when you own a Lilliput. If you already have a PSU, you can distribute the load by running the Lilliput and an external DVD drive from the ITPS 12V output and limit the load on your PSU to your CPU/HDD etc.
    I want to get rid of the board completely... I don't want any switches or buttons or relays or anything. As soon as the computer comes on, the Lilliput will turn on. I don't think you need a momentary switch because if you jump the power button (therefore always keeping the circuit closed) then it will automatically turn on whenever power is applied (I plan on using a serial relay controller to turn things on which will turn on a relay connected to the Lilliput cig adapter). The problem is the other buttons wont work which I really dont care for. So the way I see it is, if I don't need the other buttons, why have the board there at all?

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    Well you could always tap into the Opus PSU power on signal to turn it on and off... providing you have one.. or what ever PSU you use.. if it has a Power on signal (hooks to mobo power switch pins) you should effectivly be able to tap onto that and run it to the Lilliput and it should turn it off and on just like it does the PC...

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    Maximum Bitrate Altimat's Avatar
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    I'm no BSEE, but both my laptop and my Screen needed the momentary switch closure for turn-on, so this is how I did it. I wish both of them worked in the normal "switched closed = on" and "switch open = off" manner. I wouldn't be messing with relays then either! I don't plan to use the other buttons, but I kept the board and mounted it to the back of the display. I did need the IR receiver and extended that from the board to the back side of my dash panel.
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    Low Bitrate Hacksaw's Avatar
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    Sorry to hijack the main thread, but I have been thinking along similar lines to Altimat. But I thought the ITPS supplied a momentary closed signal to the motherboard to start it, and to stop.

    Is there a need for an extra relay, or could the signal just be parrallelled to the monitor too?


    Quote Originally Posted by Altimat
    The switch still needs to be momentarily closed to turn it on or off, even if you power it from the ignition (unless you use the remote). I have a small reed relay on my ITPS switched (logic low) output, and I use the momentary switch closure to turn on/off both my Lilliput and my laptop. I think this is an excellent application for the ITPS when you own a Lilliput. If you already have a PSU, you can distribute the load by running the Lilliput and an external DVD drive from the ITPS 12V output and limit the load on your PSU to your CPU/HDD etc.

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    Maximum Bitrate Altimat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hacksaw
    Sorry to hijack the main thread, but I have been thinking along similar lines to Altimat. But I thought the ITPS supplied a momentary closed signal to the motherboard to start it, and to stop.

    Is there a need for an extra relay, or could the signal just be parrallelled to the monitor too?
    Ricky327 explained this to me. The "signal" is not a switch closure; the PIC provides a logic low, or sources current to ground. So I used a small reed relay on 5V to isolate that output, and to make it an actual switch closure. This way no matter what happens to the ITPS, or my PSU wiring etc., my laptop and Lilliput can never get anything but a switch closure from that line.
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  10. #10
    Low Bitrate Hacksaw's Avatar
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    Ah, I see. Well it's not so bad if it makes it all automated.

    P.S. Great work on your install, those pics have given me the impetus to get my project moving.

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