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Thread: Legacy 5" LCD Power.

  1. #1
    Newbie masterful's Avatar
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    Question Legacy 5" LCD Power.

    I just received my Legacy 5" LCD, and I would like to begin working on my system, but I have a problem. I can't work with it in the vehicle, so I don't have the ability to power the screen. I'm suspecting that the screen could be powered by a power cable in the computer, but I'm worried about possibly frying it with too high of voltage. I don't have specifics for the screen, so could anyone advise me? What would be the best way to power this screen while it's in the house being built? Thank you in advance for putting up with my newbie questions.

    Jeffrey.
    "Quitters never win, and winners never quit, but people who never win, and never quit are idiots."

  2. #2
    Newbie masterful's Avatar
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    Anyone? What I've found out by calling Legacy, is that they have no idea whether it would work or not. They can't even give me any specifications on the screen beyond 'I know it takes a 12v DC feed'. They can't tell me amperage or anything else for that matter. I'm considering introducing an inline fuse (cut from an old Pyle FM Modulator) into the power line to the LCD and hooking it up anyway, just to see if it works or blows the fuse. I would like to hear from some of the more 'electrically gifted' people around before I resort to this however. Please let me know . . .

    Jeffrey.
    "Quitters never win, and winners never quit, but people who never win, and never quit are idiots."

  3. #3
    Variable Bitrate
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    If it needs 12V, then you can power it from the computer (the yellow wire on a hard drive power connector for the +12, the black wire for ground). Most 12V LCDs need about 1A of power, so make sure that your power supply is not going to be overloaded. If you do go beyond the limits of your PS, it should not damage anything, the system just won't work properly.

  4. #4
    Newbie masterful's Avatar
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    Sir, thank you for your response. I appreciate it. I have found a little more information about that LCD in the last hour or so. It's specifications are (apparently) DC12V+10%, <700Ma.

    After looking at some power supply specifications I'm a bit concerned about attempting this. Perhaps you can tell me if I'm correct:

    Power supply = +12V, 6.0A

    It would appear to me that the amperage is going to be way too high. Is that what you get out of it?

    Jeffrey.
    "Quitters never win, and winners never quit, but people who never win, and never quit are idiots."

  5. #5
    Variable Bitrate Mikesz's Avatar
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    Dont look at amperage like you look at voltage. The amperage rating on your PS is the "available" current. If your computer and monitor do not use all this you will be ok. Look at amperage like the diameter of a water pipe. If you use too small diameter of a pipe, not enough water will flow and the pressure (voltage) will fall, or brown out speaking electrically. To low a current rating on your PS is a problem, not to high. You should be fine. Some people here run there lcd's in their car of the computer power supply becouse the 12v from it is more stable than the cars 12v witch can vary from 11 with the car off to aroung 14 with the car on.

    mike

    [ 01-29-2002: Message edited by: Mikeszl ]
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