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Thread: Another reason why people dont search-Generation Gaps

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    Car Audio Moderator durwood's Avatar
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    Lightbulb Another reason why people dont search-Generation Gaps

    I know another thread about Newbies....

    Ok so I doubt a grandpa is going to be searching through here to figure out how to put a carputer in his car but I read some good articles a while back about generation gaps in companies. It kind of applies here too. Many of the users here are younger people who want quick answers.

    I don't know the exact ages of people on this site or their backgrounds but I would think its safe to say most people fall between 16-35..maybe older? The represents 2 generations at least.

    Ok if you look past the crappy search function built into the forum software, and past the much better google search method, and past the fact some people don't know what words to use when searching, there are other problems as regards to why people keep asking the same questions over and over. I am fairly new here myself but have been playing with carputer for almost 3 years now. I have noticed many people are afraid to ask questions sometimes at the thought of getting bashed for not searching. I have seen some that it was blatently obvious the person did not search. But I have also seen many others that have searched and couldn't find the answer. I don't believe in spoon feeding either because they will keep coming back for more and never learn anything....take this as merely as info that might explain peoples behaviors...

    These were taken from the following links:

    http://change.monster.com/articles/generations/

    http://management.monster.com/articl...n_generations/

  2. #2
    Car Audio Moderator durwood's Avatar
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    The Workplace Generation Gap

    The Workplace Generation Gap
    by Megan Malugani
    Monster Contributing Writer

    In offices across the country, there's a lot of eye rolling going on: Young professionals get exasperated with their older, workaholic colleagues who seem unhappy in their jobs, yet frustratingly stuck in their ways. Meanwhile, older professionals view their younger counterparts as slackers unwilling to pay their dues.

    Understanding what drives other generations is the first step toward bridging this generational divide in the workplace, says John Izzo, an author and healthcare consultant with offices in San Diego and Vancouver. "You have to understand that differences in values are just that," Izzo says. "They're not good and not bad. We grew up in different worlds. And at the end of the day, we all want the same things -- to feel respected and valued."
    Chuck Underwood, founder and president of The Generational Imperative, a Cincinnati-based consulting firm that studies the generations, agrees understanding is key. "Once you understand any one generation's formative years, you can make sense of that generation's workplace values and beliefs, and the gaps between the generations then tend to shrink," he says.
    Here's a look at the events and attitudes that have shaped the four generations currently sharing the current US workplace.

    The Silent Generation
    Born between 1927 and 1945, this generation started working when managers did the thinking, employees did the work, and organizations were very hierarchical, Underwood says. In this era, employers expected absolute loyalty, and rewards went to team players, not mavericks.
    Loyal and hardworking, Silents are excellent mentors to younger generations. "Their generation is distinguished by their skill in building consensus among coworkers," Underwood says. "They are good helpers, good facilitators and good listeners."

    The Baby Boomers
    Their sheer numbers mean the current 76 million Baby Boomers -- those born between 1946 and 1964 -- have always competed fiercely among themselves for jobs and promotions, Underwood says. They are competitive and assertive but put a premium on ethics and values. Because they tend to be workaholics and define themselves through work, Boomers are the "TGIM," or "Thank God It's Monday," generation, he says. Personal relationships with coworkers are important to them, and they are good team builders.
    Unlike Silents who generally enjoyed smooth career passages, "Boomers were beat up by downsizings and rightsizings and may have had several employers or types of jobs," Underwood says. "Boomers bring lots of varied experiences to the workplace."

    Generation X
    Born between 1965 and 1981, Generation X experienced some of the most difficult formative years of any generation, Underwood says. Xers "came of age when governmental and corporate leaders were lying and cheating and failing." As a result, Xers are skeptical, self-focused and self-protective at work. Having witnessed the layoffs of the 70s, 80s and 90s, they distrust big institutions and "assume that every job is temporary, every job is a stepping-stone," he says.
    In addition, because they saw their workaholic parents suffer fatigue, illness and divorce (40 percent of Xers have divorced or single parents), "Xers are trying hard to strike a better balance in their lives," Underwood says. For that reason, professions requiring overtime or varied shifts don't match up well with Xers' desire to work steady shifts, avoid long hours and keep their work and personal lives separate, he says.

    The Millennial Generation
    Born after 1982, Millennials are the most-supervised generation ever, growing up as overscheduled kids with a plethora of adult-led activities to fill their time. "Millennials have grown up very protected and might be soft in the workplace, especially in combative situations," Underwood says.
    After seeing how Gen Xers rose with the tech boom of the late 90s and fell with the bust of the early 2000s, Millennials, whose defining event was September 11, are seeking job security in fields like healthcare. "Millennials have a strong sense of nation and patriotism," Underwood says. "They see occupations like firefighting and nursing to be heroic because of all the visuals they saw surrounding 9/11." They are also actively involved in community service and want to pursue occupations that make a difference.
    Expected to rival or exceed the Baby Boomer generation in number, Millennials may be forced to compete and work extra hours to get ahead, Underwood says.

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    Car Audio Moderator durwood's Avatar
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    Intergenerational Miscommunication in the Workplace
    by Kate Wildrick
    Monster Contributing Writer

    Every generation has been grumbling about the same thing for eons: The younger generation. Here's a sampling of what some of the complaints in the workplace might sound like these days:

    "Used to be that when I needed something done, I'd ask someone face-to-face."

    "I remember the days when people started a conversation, they finished the conversation."

    "Once upon a time, people would come talk to me rather than shoot me an instant message."

    Frustration with Younger Coworkers
    Many professionals feel there is acute tension between generations. "I hired a recruiter who is 28 years old," explains one 45-year-old senior HR generalist from the Pacific Northwest. "Since arriving, my colleagues and I have noticed that he frequently bypasses the chain of command to do what he thinks needs to be done. Although we meet with him to discuss the importance of communicating regularly through the proper channels, it's as if he just doesn't get it.... Oftentimes, he'll up and leave right in the middle of a discussion after coming to me for information. It's like he's got what he needed out of the meeting and leaves, because he doesn't see a need to be there anymore. What he doesn't see is how insulted I feel by him leaving like that."
    Indeed, those in their 30s and older can find their younger counterparts frustrating to deal with. These more seasoned workers often lament younger workers' tendency to be curt, blunt, irreverent and impersonal.

    Too Much Information
    But the tension between generations goes both ways. David Chermak is a 31 year-old cost accountant. Working in the manufacturing industry, he reports that his team, comprised of Baby Boomers, has a tendency to "overexplain" concepts when troubleshooting issues.
    "Even very specific questions seem to require long, drawn-out answers," laments Chermak. "It is like asking a cook if there is rosemary in the chicken, and the answer not only encompasses the entire recipe but also what store has the best price on chicken, why white meat is better than dark, and explains how buying locally produced food saves fossil fuels -- oh and yes, there is rosemary."

    Our workplaces are changing. Technology has revolutionized the workplace. The younger generation, particularly Generation Y (born 1977 to 1989), thrives in a fast-paced technological world. They grew up with nanny cams, cell phones, video games, voice mail, PCs and the Internet. Their constant exposure to technology has even caused some to speculate that their brains have developed differently. The familiarity of so many different technological media has enabled them to process a huge amount of information in a short amount of time. Sometimes referred to as the "CNN Generation," this group of workers often only want bits and pieces of information -- the parts important to them -- to accomplish their tasks. In some circumstances, these individuals may never have learned effective face-to-face interpersonal communication skills, due to the fact that so much of their social interaction has been over instant/text messaging, cell phones and email.

    Adapting to a Project-Based Workplace
    As technology continues to be integrated into the workplace, outside factors also are impacting the way generations communicate. In the "Generational Shift, What We Saw at the Workplace Revolution" whitepaper released by Rainmakerthinking in 2003, one of the primary findings was that the employer-employee relationship has become more project-based, as opposed to the traditional chain-of-command structure. This phenomenon resulted from the mass layoffs, downsizings and offshoring that occurred in the 1990s. As businesses stepped into a more volatile global economy, they adopted the do-more-with-less mantra and began using a more short-term approach to managing business.

    Effective communication is imperative as businesses shift to this new fast-paced paradigm. Striking a balance with both generations can be difficult. Younger generations are geared to working in a fast-paced environment and getting information on a whim. Short, abrupt communication may occur and leave out important details that others may need to know in order to provide adequate responses. Older generations may overinform, causing confusion or extra work in sifting out pertinent information.

    There is no doubt that words, actions and sometimes behavior can be misconstrued in the workplace and even across generations. Business and human resources professionals need to be able to recognize how these changes are impacting the work environment and the relationships within them. Understanding what makes each generation unique is only one piece of the puzzle when it comes to managing employees.

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    Car Audio Moderator durwood's Avatar
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    Sorry...just killing time at work.

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    The Last Good Gremlin GizmoQ's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by durwood View Post
    I know another thread about Newbies....

    Ok so I doubt a grandpa is going to be searching through here to figure out how to put a carputer in his car but I read some good articles a while back about generation gaps in companies. It kind of applies here too. Many of the users here are younger people who want quick answers.

    I don't know the exact ages of people on this site or their backgrounds but I would think its safe to say most people fall between 16-35..maybe older? The represents 2 generations at least.
    I take offense to that statement!

    O.K. my grandchild is less than a year old and I haven't hit 50 yet, but hey, when I needed help who do you think is helping most of these young whippersnappers around here. Where's the My Thread mafia when you need them?
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    Confusion Master
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    Quote Originally Posted by GizmoQ View Post
    I take offense to that statement!

    O.K. my grandchild is less than a year old and I haven't hit 50 yet, but hey, when I needed help who do you think is helping most of these young whippersnappers around here. Where's the My Thread mafia when you need them?

    Why do you need the My Thread Mafia for this one?

    I often get called grandpa around these parts by certain individuals, although I am at least 9 years off such a thing (I hope). And sometimes I want a quick answer, because otherwise by the time I get the answer I might just have forgotten the question.






    Now why did you want the My Thread mafia?

    or have I already asked that question?

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    Car Audio Moderator durwood's Avatar
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    O.K. my grandchild is less than a year old and I haven't hit 50 yet, but hey, when I needed help who do you think is helping most of these young whippersnappers around here.
    hahaha. Sweet. There are always exceptions.

    You are probably just outside the bell curve then. Nothing wrong with a couple seasoned veterens around here. So do you notice any problems dealing with the kids of today? Usually they want answers fast without a big explanation and without doign a lot of extra work. They feel it is deserved to them, since the knowledge is already out there, why should they have to figure it out again? Don't you think? That's all I was trying to get at.

    The "MT Mafia".....

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    Car Audio Moderator durwood's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enforcer View Post
    And sometimes I want a quick answer, because otherwise by the time I get the answer I might just have forgotten the question.
    Sometimes I don't even hear the question. Maybe I am getting old...or just deaf.

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    Maximum Bitrate JimmyFitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by durwood View Post
    Sometimes I don't even hear the question. Maybe I am getting old...or just deaf.
    What?
    ~Jimmy

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    Maximum Bitrate LagunaICE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Originally Posted by durwood
    Sometimes I don't even hear the question. Maybe I am getting old...or just deaf.
    Sometimes I see dead people.

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