Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: I'm thinking about being an Electrical Engineer

  1. #1
    Clover Grayscale's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    1,549

    I'm thinking about being an Electrical Engineer

    I'm about to go off to colllege and I've already got 32 hours under my belt. For Information Technology Networking/Programming. But I'm thinking about being some kind of engineer. Either Electrical Engineer or a Computer Scientist/Engineer. So some of you guys who are either an EE or CS/E let me know your opinions on your work!
    CarPC install is starting to come along again...

  2. #2
    Raw Wave wizardPC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Nashville
    Posts
    2,635
    Computer Science = programming
    Electrical Engineering = lots of math, making circuits, more math

    Computer Engineering = Electrical Engineering + Computer Science

    For perspective, I have a business degree in Information Systems (programming + business stuff + systems analysis) and one of the guys I work with is a Computer Engineer while the other has the same degrees as me.
    Debt as of 1/1/05: $34,354.48
    Debt as of July 4, 2007: $0.00 explanation
    I'M DEBT FREE!!
    I'm now a reasonably successful gunblogger.

  3. #3
    Maximum Bitrate
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Cali
    Posts
    640
    Quote Originally Posted by wizardPC
    Computer Science = programming
    Electrical Engineering = lots of math, making circuits, more math

    Computer Engineering = Electrical Engineering + Computer Science

    For perspective, I have a business degree in Information Systems (programming + business stuff + systems analysis) and one of the guys I work with is a Computer Engineer while the other has the same degrees as me.
    For electrical engineering it is also quite likely you will spend tons of time in the lab, so its not just hypothetical math or making circuits. My 6-month internship last year was 70% lab work. I am an Electrical Engineering student by the way, hopefully will be done in June.

    Computer Science
    If you have no problem with lots of coding on various systems and can actually enjoy it, by all means become a Computer Science Engineer. You better enjoy coding though, I met a lot of people that are good at coding, but just did not like that becoming their life.

    Electrical Engineering
    If you want to be closer to the hardware side, anything from power supplies to microcontrollers, then you should go for Electrical Engineering. Despite what many think, unless you go for pure Analog Design, you will need to know some coding as well. Something like VHDL or Verilog.

    Computer Engineering
    From my experience working with Computer Engineers, they are more or less castrated mix of Electrical Engineering and Comp Sci Engineers. They lack the in-depth knowledge of either area for the most part. However, if you have a good coding background, and will have time to take optional classes for EE, this is a good major if you will be working with something like Embedded Systems. You will need to have decent hardware understanding to implement software on it. As a side note, Embedded Systems would be of great interest for auto market, and particularly with applications that this forum is concerned about.

    Choose wisely, changing major can be a pain in a butt. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Maximum Bitrate kiltjim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    PA, USA
    Posts
    805
    I guess by the way that everyone else is describing, it depends on the college. I go to Penn State, and to tell you the truth, if your degree ends in the word Engineer, you might as well, lube up with some really nice KY (regular flavored, or that warming stuff, doesn't really matter) and get ready to take it in the behind.

    I'm in Mechanical Engineering, and I have not seen an actual mechanical system in like 3 years. I know what the differential equation is to do this and do that, but I have no idea what to do with a gear if you jammed it up my nose. (I really do know more than that, but my degree covers nothing of it).

    I know very many Electrical Engineers as well, and to tell you the truth, they do the same thing. Alot of math, no real world work, and lots and lots of math.

    I would much rather be a Mechanical Engineer Technology degree. Its still a Bachelor of Science, but you get a lot more hands on experience.

    But like I said, it may be just my college. I've known other engineers that love school. But I think they may crazy....
    2000 Subaru OBS

    Dell P3 @ 900 Mhz
    7" Lilliput TS w/DigitalWW in-dash mount
    80GB External HD

    I am Zero Bitrate....

  5. #5
    FLAC migel628's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    New Windsor, NY
    Posts
    1,114
    I have an AAS in Electrical Engineering Technology, basically hands-on, non-calc based EE. That was where I learned a get deal about circuits and electricity. I loved the cousrework & once I was done, I landed a sweet *** job at IBM as a server test tech working on mainframes...If you like getting down & dirty, then an ET degree is for your, however if you like doing calculations, then go for the Eng. degree...

    BTW, I never used a single thing I had learned in my AAS program and still don't. I guess it's all about learning how to think.
    "I'm a dick!"
    "I must seek knowledge and it's bastard son truth" - The State

  6. #6
    FLAC PatO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2000
    Location
    Afton MN
    Posts
    1,120
    As everyone else has alluded to - the word "Engineer" has been b@stardized by educational institutions. I'm a Software Engineer! I haven't engineered a piece of software in my life! I'm a lacky to the corporate politic!

    However, if you plan on going into a programming field, you may want to take a course in foreign languages. Hindi seems to be popular of late.
    http://www.jeepmp3.com/
    CarPC Stolen. Starting over.
    Ne1 recognize the avatar?

  7. #7
    Raw Wave rando's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Redondo Beach, CA
    Posts
    1,973
    Quote Originally Posted by rushnrockt
    Computer Engineering
    From my experience working with Computer Engineers, they are more or less castrated mix of Electrical Engineering and Comp Sci Engineers. They lack the in-depth knowledge of either area for the most part.
    At my school, this degree shared core corriculum with the EE and CS degrees but certainly wasn't castrated with respect to the CS side of things. CS and CS&E people took all the same SW and theoretical CS classes. CS&E added to this the core EE classes as well as several upper division digital design classes. As a trade off, a few less liberal arts electives were required.

    IMHO, these are the people companies ought to be hiring for any kind of digital circuit design, embedded systems, device drivers, or anything a CS person would be qualified to do. For any significant amount of analog work, you'd still want an EE in the mix. Unfortunately, most people don't fully understand the role of the CS&E degree and assume it's the castrated mix you mentioned. They go off hiring EEs to work their digital solutions and end up with hacks.

  8. #8
    Clover Grayscale's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Arkansas
    Posts
    1,549
    Thanks for the replies guys!

    So, it sounds like Computer Engineering deals with both Hardware and Software,

    Electrical Engineering is a lot of math + circuits and microprocessors which sounds cool,

    and Computer Sciences is more of a hands-on programming kind of thing.

    So what looks best to companies?

    I would like the flexibility of Computer Engineering, because I like both hardware and software. I'm starting to get more and more interested in electronics, and have always been interested in software. I am pretty decent at writing code.

    Also, are you guys saying that Computer Engineering doesn't get as involved or specific in hardware or software but is more of a general broad view of things?
    CarPC install is starting to come along again...

  9. #9
    Maximum Bitrate eugenen's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    858
    Depends on the school. Some mix up the terms and call electronic engineering electrical engineering. My degree is in Electronic engineering, but there are not a lot of jobs out there unless you want to move to china

  10. #10
    FLAC IntellaWorks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    NH
    Posts
    1,173

    .

    I've got a BA in Computer Science and I'm an IT consultant, I was schooled in both Hardware and Software.. But I have to say I learned more on my own, I'm actually finishing up my last semister and garunteed a job upon my graduation. I get everything from designing a machine to trouble shooting VBA apps to developing my own apps...

    To be honest, I'm really interested in System designer... Developing computer hardware and software solutions... It's like a cross between Electrical Engineering & Software Engineering..
    Progress [I will seriously never be done!]
    Via EPIA MII
    512MB RAM
    OEM GPS (embedded)
    nLite WinXP pro on
    1GB Extreme III CF card
    Carnetix 1260 startup/ DC-DC regulator
    Software: Still, re-Writing my existing front end in .Net

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Electrical Diagram Help?
    By Optikal in forum General Hardware Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-10-2004, 10:16 AM
  2. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-30-2004, 05:38 AM
  3. Thinking about selling my set-up need some advice
    By swifty8083 in forum Classified Archive
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-08-2004, 01:10 PM
  4. Some Electrical Questions
    By Kayos Frawg in forum General Hardware Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 04-16-2004, 03:56 PM
  5. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-29-2004, 10:32 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •