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Thread: final wiring for m2-atx

  1. #1
    Variable Bitrate
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    Mar 2007
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    356

    final wiring for m2-atx

    Ok, I'm done with fabrication of PC case and I'm just about ready to actually wire up the power supply.


    I bought the recommended 8 gauge power wire and an inline fuse (40 amp)

    now the idea is to put the fuse in the power wire close to the battery as possible so most of the wire is fire protected or whatever.

    My question is, what is point of the 8 gauge wire if the wire leads that come with the m2-atx is only 18 gauge(or 16, can't remember)

    so the 6 inches of the 18 gauge power wire that snaps into the m2-atx is potential to fire/failure as using the ciggarette lighter wires?

    maybe I'm missing something, like am I suppose to use another inline fuse to step down the 8 gauge power wire to 18 gauge for the lead?

    this really doesn't make sent to me that we need the 8 gauge when the lead from the m2-atx is so small.

    I'm a newbie so I guess someone will chime in.

    thanks

  2. #2
    Newbie
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    5
    Here is what mine looked like, I was lazy and connected the 10 awg to the lead to the power supply by a screw on cap


  3. #3
    Variable Bitrate
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    356
    thanks, so you did step it down a bit, but only to 10 gauge. so from 10 gauge you wired straight to the small 18 or 16 gauge lead wire from m2-atx.

    thanks for sharing your wiring scheme.

    I'm only spinning a hardrive, ram, cpu, and maybe a usb device or two. I wonder how my watts I'll actually pull from my 90 watt power supply.

  4. #4
    Maximum Bitrate Zebelkhan's Avatar
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    Dec 2004
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    Bay Area, CA
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    Maximum power out of M2-ATX is 180 watts. M1-atx has 90 watts. In a 12 volt system, that is 15 amps for M2 and 7.5 amps for M1. So a 40 amp fuse is an over-kill. The thick 8 guage wire may sound over-kill too but it does serve a purpose. Voltage does drop accross a wire because it acts as a "resistor". The thicker the wire, the less loss or voltage drop you will have so you can run it for longer distances. The wires right at the power supply can be smaller gauges because they are short and voltage drop will be very minimal there.
    Compaq Evo D510 e-PC - P4 2.0 - 512M RAM - 120G 3.5 HD - 7" Xenarc 700TSV - DSATX fitted nicely inside the PC case

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