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Thread: Will a UPS kill my inverter?

  1. #1
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    Will a UPS kill my inverter?

    I have a 300 W inverter and am considering using a ups between the inverter and comp. I have seen a little bit of discussion on the issue and a few people have mentioned that it may kill the inverter because of to much power draw. Any one have any insight?

    My idea is:

    Use the UPS to power the comp for 3-4 min (its old the batt is dieing) and then use power chute connected via serial to shut the computer off when the UPS drains. This would give me ample time to get new mp3s via wireless and wouldnt put any strain on the car battery? It also is a semi-make shift shutdown controller.

    Please advise! Thanks!

  2. #2
    FLAC
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    The UPS will most likely always think that it's getting bad power and always stay on battery power.
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  3. #3
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    Would the battery charge on bad power?

  4. #4
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    Bump

  5. #5
    Retired Admin Aaron Cake's Avatar
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    This sounds like a really convoluted idea...Think about it:

    12V -> 120V - >12V -> 120V -> 12V, 5V

    See my point?

    Why not just use a DC-DC converter? I assume you are running an ATX system, so a simple software command can be used to shut the system down.

    And no, the UPS battery will not charge off of the inverter.
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  6. #6
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    Yea, agreed it must be very very inefficant. Thanks for the input.

  7. #7
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    2V -> 120V - >12V -> 120V -> 12V, 5V
    See my point?
    Why not just use a DC-DC converter?
    Aaron has a good point, using an inverter a UPS, and then a PC is a very in-effecient way to convert your power source. The reason TO use such a system is the amount of power you CAN convert. I can convert nearly 400 Watts via this system. With a DC-DC Opus style converter I can only get a MAX of around 150 Watts.

    And also his diagram is a bit off
    12v -> 120v -> UPS (spits out Voltage corrected) -> 120v -> PSU -> 12v +/-5v

    My APC UPS SU700NET hasa sidelined inverter in it that will charge the batteries if needed. It will switch to battery powered 120v in the event there's no 120v input (the Car 12v Power inverter that runs the UPS is turned off)
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