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Thread: Possible to shield RF noise from inverter?

  1. #1
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    Question Possible to shield RF noise from inverter?

    I'm currently running an inverter (until I can save for the Arise 865) and a stereo RF transmitter - poor combo I know.

    Is there any way to shield the inverter or rig a temporary (cheap) solution get the sound card output to the head unit, or am I SOL?
    $150 special - P233, 32MB, 4GB HDD, Win 98SE, custom software, inverter & stereo RF transmitter (ugh!), Muse sound card, NIC

  2. #2
    Retired Admin Aaron Cake's Avatar
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    Cool

    Put the inverter in a metal case and ground it. Replace all inverter power cables with shielded units and ground to the same place you grounded the case. Also, use a ground loop isolator to help get rid of hum.
    Player: Pentium 166MMX, Amptron 598LMR MB w/onboard Sound, Video, LAN, 10.2 Gig Fujitsu Laptop HD, Arise 865 DC-DC Converter, Lexan Case, Custom Software w/Voice Interface, MS Access Based Playlists
    Car: 1986 Mazda RX-7 Turbo (highly modded), 1978 RX-7 Beater (Dead, parting out), 2001 Honda Insight
    "If one more body-kitted, cut-spring-lowered, farty-exhausted Civic revs on me at an intersection, I swear I'm going to get out of my car and cram their ridiculous double-decker aluminium wing firmly up their rump."

  3. #3
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    Post

    Thanks! I'll give that a shot...
    $150 special - P233, 32MB, 4GB HDD, Win 98SE, custom software, inverter & stereo RF transmitter (ugh!), Muse sound card, NIC

  4. #4
    Variable Bitrate
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    Ground loop isolators you have to be careful with. They color the sound. Some just a fraction, others more. The proper thing to do is instead ground the p/s, PC, stereo, EQ, amps, etc., to a common ground point. Just grounding to the car body should work but with today's cars you have to be sure your grounding to a part that's got good contact with the frame of the vehicle. With my setup, because of a need for power exclusive from the stereo system, I ran 8AWG to the back of the truck and used distribution block from a marine parts store. Then I figured to do the same for the stereo. Now I hook everything up I need to the distro block. ZERO noise whatsoever in the system.
    P4 2.4GHz, Intel mobo w/onboard sound & video, 128MB memory, 100GB Seagate Momentus laptop drive, Xenarc 700TSV 7" touchscreen, IRman using Girder, 150W Opus dc/dc psu, Alpine CDA-9835 h/u, MBQuart speakers, Infinity 15" sub, MTX amps.

  5. #5
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    Angry

    Hi

    I have a similar problem but instead of a hum I get a crackly signal.
    The ground loop isolator where does it connect to and what brand do you recommend.
    The ones I have seen for sale in the US connect as a pass through with RCA connectors and look like they are using a set of inductors this was the Boss B-25N.

    I am from the other side of the world (Aus) so don't have the same sources available to me and want to get the correct one the first time.

    Where do you get, or how do you make shielded power cables.

    Thanks in advance


    BTW I have found a car cassette system that has a jack on the front marked CD drive. This could probabally take a straight plug in from your MP3 player. It's $110 Aus dollars that makes it approx $52 US check it out
    main page http://www.eurovox.com.au/main.htm
    model page E6932 http://www.eurovox.com.au/e6932.asp

    No I don't get a comission.

    I may install one as a last resort mainly because my car doesn't like casette players the one that is in it at the moment is the third that has been installed. They just stop being able to play tapes !

  6. #6
    Retired Admin Aaron Cake's Avatar
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    Cool

    Crackly signals usually mean a bad connection somewhere in the audio circuit. If you are using 1/8" or 1/4" phone plugs, that is probably your problem.
    Player: Pentium 166MMX, Amptron 598LMR MB w/onboard Sound, Video, LAN, 10.2 Gig Fujitsu Laptop HD, Arise 865 DC-DC Converter, Lexan Case, Custom Software w/Voice Interface, MS Access Based Playlists
    Car: 1986 Mazda RX-7 Turbo (highly modded), 1978 RX-7 Beater (Dead, parting out), 2001 Honda Insight
    "If one more body-kitted, cut-spring-lowered, farty-exhausted Civic revs on me at an intersection, I swear I'm going to get out of my car and cram their ridiculous double-decker aluminium wing firmly up their rump."

  7. #7
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    Question

    About shielding the power cables, what if you ran the cables through some metal conduit which would run straight into your metal box and be grounded with the box?

  8. #8
    Variable Bitrate
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    Post

    If you're running an inverter and can't get rid of the noise you can try running the system with the computer power supply outside the computer case. Like have all the units seperate, power inverter, power supply and computer.

    That's what I did and I have absolutely no noise without a groundloop isolators and all that jazz.
    95 Honda Civic DX Coupe - In Progress
    mp3civic site

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