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Thread: M1 ATX 90 watt. No power to fuse.

  1. #1
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    M1 ATX 90 watt. No power to fuse.

    I have just purchased a used micro system consisting of a custom alloy case, Epia CL10000 mobo & M1 ATX power supply.

    I have wired the power supply to a 12v deep cycle battery, power is getting to to the input terminals but not to the 10 amp fuse. Settings are; J6 to mobo, J7 empty, J4 with LED to see if power is getting thru. There is no smell or sign of burning on the board.

    Should power get to the fuse regardless of settings or peripherals ?
    Any ideas on the problem ??

    cheers.

  2. #2
    Maximum Bitrate JimmyFitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by squelch View Post
    I have just purchased a used micro system consisting of a custom alloy case, Epia CL10000 mobo & M1 ATX power supply.

    I have wired the power supply to a 12v deep cycle battery, power is getting to to the input terminals but not to the 10 amp fuse. Settings are; J6 to mobo, J7 empty, J4 with LED to see if power is getting thru. There is no smell or sign of burning on the board.

    Should power get to the fuse regardless of settings or peripherals ?
    Any ideas on the problem ??

    cheers.
    What did you connect to J12? it won't turn on without it.
    ~Jimmy

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by squelch View Post
    I have just purchased a used micro system consisting of a custom alloy case, Epia CL10000 mobo & M1 ATX power supply.

    I have wired the power supply to a 12v deep cycle battery, power is getting to to the input terminals but not to the 10 amp fuse. Settings are; J6 to mobo, J7 empty, J4 with LED to see if power is getting thru. There is no smell or sign of burning on the board.

    Should power get to the fuse regardless of settings or peripherals ?
    Any ideas on the problem ??

    cheers.
    What do you mean by "get to the fuse"

    If you have power connected to the proper wire/connector on the M1, there should be power "at the fuse", or through the fuse if the fuse is installed, and it is ot blown. Recheck your wiring to the M1, make sure the correct wires have power.

    Michael
    ...I love the French language...especially to curse with...Nom de Dieu de putain de bordel de merde de saloperies de connards d'enculés de ta mère. You see, it's like wiping your *** with silk, I love it.

  4. #4
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    J11 & J12 to positive, J13 to negative. Power is not getting from the input terminals to the fuse or the fuse terminal. The block between the input and the fuse, or the fuse mount itself appear to be not letting the power through. Fuse is good but power isn't even getting to the fuse terminal. No obvious signs of damage or bad solder.


  5. #5
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    You're not making any sense. If you're not even getting power at the fuse, what does this have to do with the M1-ATX at all? of course it's not going to work if it's not even getting power, you need to sort out your wiring issue first.
    But don't take it from me! here's a quote from a real, live newbie:
    Quote Originally Posted by Viscouse
    I am learning buttloads just by searching on this forum. I've learned 2 big things so far: 1-it's been done before, and 2-if it hasn't, there is a way to do it.
    eegeek.net

  6. #6
    Maximum Bitrate JimmyFitz's Avatar
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    I just checked my M1 board. The power input from J11 feeds to the fuse through the part on the board that is labelled FB1. It is probably a ferrite bead. Yours may be bad. The green circle is around the suspect part, and the yellow lines indicate what leads connect by traces on the bottom side of the board. Try taking the M1 out of the system and use an ohmmeter while no power is applied to see if you can get continuity through the yellow path.
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    ~Jimmy

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    evandude, the problem is between the input terminal and the fuse.

    JimmyFitz, thanks, you understand my dilemna. I don't have an ohmmeter. Using my continuity tester (light globe) with power on there was current between the the 2 outer, then between the 2 inner wires on FB1.

  8. #8
    Maximum Bitrate JimmyFitz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by squelch View Post
    evandude, the problem is between the input terminal and the fuse.

    JimmyFitz, thanks, you understand my dilemna. I don't have an ohmmeter. Using my continuity tester (light globe) with power on there was current between the the 2 outer, then between the 2 inner wires on FB1.
    Inspect the bottom of the board and see if the traces are damaged. Maybe one of the solder joints is not good. An ohmmeter might detect a poor connection better.
    ~Jimmy

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    Quote Originally Posted by squelch View Post
    evandude, the problem is between the input terminal and the fuse.

    JimmyFitz, thanks, you understand my dilemna. I don't have an ohmmeter. Using my continuity tester (light globe) with power on there was current between the the 2 outer, then between the 2 inner wires on FB1.
    You really should purchase a cheap multimeter if you want to have any chance of fixing this. Using a test light to fix your M1 is like trying to answer a multiple choice exam by bubbling the circles with a pen. Ya, there is a mark there, but the computer can't read it. It is just the wrong tool for the job. RadioShack probably still sells a cheap versio (I bought a $10 version from them about 10 years ago, and it is still working really well)

    Michael
    ...I love the French language...especially to curse with...Nom de Dieu de putain de bordel de merde de saloperies de connards d'enculés de ta mère. You see, it's like wiping your *** with silk, I love it.

  10. #10
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    There are no signs of damage or bad solder.

    Wiredwrx, yep, I will have to get a multimeter and learn how to use it to go any further, the light is crude but simple.

    It seems that the power to the fuse has nothing electronic to stop supply, this is all taken care of after the fuse, it is all mechenical ie: bad wire, bad solder.



    I appreciate all the replies, thanks.

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