Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 58

Thread: FAQ: How do I power my DC-DC PSU on my workbench?

  1. #1
    Neither darque nor pervert DarquePervert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Elsewhere
    Posts
    13,948

    FAQ: How do I power my DC-DC PSU on my workbench?

    So you've got your computer put together (or it arrived UPS) and you're ready to load the operating system, front end, navigation application, support software, and maybe even a pretty skin for the front end. But it's raining outside and you really don't feel like sitting in your car for a Windows installation. You also want to test the shutdown capabilities of the PSU to make certain it's all setup the way you want it to behave.

    Well, you can use a spare ATX power supply to provide 12v to the PSU. This FAQ will show you how to accomplish that so you can tweak and customize your vehicle computer inside. These instructions only show you the "poor mans" method. There are certainly other ways to power your setup inside, but this method uses parts that most of us geeks have lying around.


    Required components
    - (1) ATX power supply that provides sufficient power on the 12v rail. Typically, 10A-15A should be sufficient. You can get the ratings from a sticker on the side of the PSU.
    - (1) 3-pin HDD pass-thru adapter like this one.
    - (1) low-voltage switch that will maintain on/off state
    - (3)Terminal connectors that are suitable for your DC-DC PSU or SDC
    - 14AWG Wire (thicker wire may be used, but it may be unwieldy to work with)
    - Method of connecting wires (solder/heatshrink or crimp connectors are preferred)


    Background information
    An ATX power supply provides 12v DC power to the motherboard and to components like hard drives, optical drives and the like. This is the same input voltage that is required for your DC-DC power supply or shutdown controller. To utilize the 12v DC from the ATX power supply, you need to do two things:
    1) Wire the DC-DC power supply's inputs to a 12v source from the ATX power supply. The easiest place to get the 12v is the HDD connector.
    2) Fool the ATX power supply to believe it's connected to a motherboard and powered on, so it will supply 12v

    In addition, you'll want a switch in order to simulate turning ignition on and off to insure that the shutdown capabilities of your DC-DC PSU (or standalone shutdown controller) work the way you want.

    The hard drive molex connector provides power in two voltages, +5v and +12v. The yellow wire is 12v and the red wire is 5v. The two black wires are both grounds. The yellow wire will provide power to the DC-DC PSU, as well as to the ACC line for startup/shutdown control.

    This procedure assumes that you have your computer assembled properly and the DC-DC PSU or SDC setup is wired correctly to the motherboard, including the two-wire connector that goes to the power switch header on your motherboard!!!


    Assembly
    Connector to fool the ATX power supply
    1) Cut the three-pin fan header off about halfway along the wire.
    2) Strip the wire that goes to the outer pin and connect it to the unused outer pin on the 3-pin fan header.

    Connector for the DC-DC PSU
    1) Cut the female end off the pass-thru connector as close to the female end as possible. Discard the female connector.
    2) Extend the yellow (+12v) and a black (ground) wires to your desired length. Six inches or so should be more than sufficient.
    3) Attach terminal connectors to the extended +12v and ground lines.
    4) Connect the thinner wire that went to the HDD connector to the input side of the switch.
    5) Connect another wire to the output side of the switch and attach a terminal connector to the other end of that wire.
    6) Connect the +12v, ground and switched lines to their appropriate terminals on the DC-DC PSU or SDC, it matches the following diagram:


    Usage
    You now have two connectors. One is connected to your PSU at one end and a HDD connector to the other end. Make certain this is wired up first. Also, make certain the switch is in its off position.

    The other connector (the 3-pin fan header) goes into the ATX connector that would normally go into the motherboard. The two outer pins of the fan header should fit nicely into pins 13 & 14 of that connector. You can locate the correct pins in this diagram:

    The wire colors may or may not be the same!

    Plug the ATX power supply into the wall and turn it on, if required.

    At this point, cross your fingers, pray to your deity and turn on the switch in your homemade adapter. When the switch is in the on position, you should get +12v to your IGN line of your DC-DC PSU or SDC, which should send the pulse to the motherboard and initate booting of the PC.

  2. #2
    _
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Little Elm, Texas
    Posts
    13,500
    bravo!
    Jan Bennett
    FS: VW MKIV Bezel for 8" Lilliput - 95% Finished

    Please post on the forums! Chances are, someone else has or will have the same questions as you!

  3. #3
    Constant Bitrate popi79's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    150

    Red face M2-atx Wont Boot!!!.... Oops... My Error... Read And Don't Laugh...

    M2-atx Wont Boot!!!.... Oops... My Error... Read And Don't Laugh...

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Just to make a remark, when you're trying to test the m2-atx with a regular atx psu or bench test unit make sure you're supplying above 13v, It happen to me, I thought my unit was damaged or had the wont boot issue like others are saying here, but instead I supplied car voltage and unit works well.

    This is just a thought so you wont go waste the better part of your day trying to boot your carputer (like it happened to me) with bench power...

  4. #4
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    38
    Quote Originally Posted by DarquePervert View Post
    There are certainly other ways to power your setup inside...

    Can anyone contribute any other methods of getting 12 volts of power inside? The PSU I was going to use only supplies 6 amps on the 12 volt rail

  5. #5
    Fusion Brain Creator 2k1Toaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Colorado, but Canadian!
    Posts
    10,049
    Quote Originally Posted by Dracord View Post
    Can anyone contribute any other methods of getting 12 volts of power inside? The PSU I was going to use only supplies 6 amps on the 12 volt rail
    anything with a transformer to get DC, then it is all about either stepping up the voltage, or trimming down the voltage.

    Although, in all honesty a cheap ATX or even AT power supply is a few dollars at a local junk shop or eBay.
    Fusion Brain Version 6 Released!
    1.9in x 2.9in -- 47mm x 73mm
    30 Digital Outputs -- Directly drive a relay
    15 Analogue Inputs -- Read sensors like temperature, light, distance, acceleration, and more
    Buy now in the MP3Car.com Store

  6. #6
    Registered User cliffloehr's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Decatur, AL
    Posts
    88
    My oasis (work shop) is in the garage so I've been using the car battery charger to power up the CarPC on the bench.

    It's always concerned me that the voltage is 13.5VDC, but thats what the actual vehicle reads so when the battery is fully charged.

  7. #7
    Registered User cliffloehr's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Decatur, AL
    Posts
    88
    Ok, I tried the ATX solution... here is what I found.

    To turn on an ATX power Supply you must short pin 14 (PS_ON) with any black (COM) wire
    To KEEP it on you need to short Pin 8 (PWR_OK) with any red (+5VDC) wire.



    NOTE: Apparently the Power_OK pin checks to see if a load is present and keeps the PSU alive. This may only be needed on newer PSUs

    Good Luck!

  8. #8
    Variable Bitrate vladcarpc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Sao Paulo, Brazil
    Posts
    241
    Quote Originally Posted by popi79 View Post
    (...)
    Just to make a remark, when you're trying to test the m2-atx with a regular atx psu or bench test unit make sure you're supplying above 13v,
    (...)
    Hi, how did you make your ATX PSU supply above 13v?

    I have here a "regular PC" 300W ATX PSU, and in the side label it shows that it offers +3.3V 14A, +5V 25A, 12V 10A, +5VSB 1A, -5V 0.5A, -12V 0.5A.

    I was thinking to use it to power my M2-ATX and test the CarPC before going to the Car.
    \/ |_ /\ [)
    1995 Civic Sedan EX
    CarPC status: [||||||||||||] 100% - Phase 1 Complete!
    YouTube video - WorkLog

  9. #9
    Variable Bitrate vladcarpc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Sao Paulo, Brazil
    Posts
    241

    Thumbs up Working

    Hi, here are some pics of how I did it. Thanks for the instructions!

    \/ |_ /\ [)
    1995 Civic Sedan EX
    CarPC status: [||||||||||||] 100% - Phase 1 Complete!
    YouTube video - WorkLog

  10. #10
    Variable Bitrate VmtSquad's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Montréal, Quebec, Canada
    Posts
    283
    Thanks alot VLAD! Coudn't be more CLEAR!!! Thanks for the pictures! Im waitin for my screen then I will test everything with my OPUS 150w..thanks again!
    VmtSquad - I sold my soul to Honda!
    Final Install
    CarPC progress: 95%

Page 1 of 6 123456 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. FAQ: How to Wire an OPUS PSU
    By Quattro in forum The FAQ Emporium
    Replies: 74
    Last Post: 08-26-2006, 12:38 PM
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-22-2005, 12:59 AM
  3. Power USB hub from psu
    By meyer64 in forum Power Supplies
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-20-2005, 10:34 PM
  4. Need help finding an AC to DC power adaptor
    By Squeezer in forum General Hardware Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 12-29-2000, 12:27 PM
  5. dc to dc ATX power supply
    By Kaizer Soze in forum General Hardware Discussion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 10-21-1999, 07:47 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •