Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Thread: DSATX 220w PSU Review

  1. #1
    Fusion Brain Creator
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    2,221

    DSATX 220w PSU Review

    DS-ATX DC-DC PSU Review
    Review performed by: Tim Elmore


    My background:

    I am majoring in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Florida, and have taken several classes dealing with electronics and heat flow/heat transfer. I am competent in circuit design, including discrete components, operational amplifiers, power regulation, and control/instrumentation.

    Test setup:

    Car:
    1993 Ford Explorer w/ high output alternator
    4ga cabling to rear distribution block
    US Acoustics 800w subwoofer amp, 65x4 speaker amp
    Audio fed through Pioneer headunit
    CDT Audio CL-61a components

    Computer:
    AMD Duron 950 CPU @ stock
    Abit KX7-33 motherboard
    80GB Hard drive
    Voodoo 3 PCI video card
    D-Link wireless card
    96kbit Envy DAC on Chaintech PCI audio card
    Xenarc 7Ē touch screen on PSU power

    Test gear:
    Fluke 179 Multimeter w/ temperature probe


    First impressions:

    Packaging was excellent. PSU was inside electrostatic safe bag, wrapped in bubble tape, with shredded paper packaging inside a cardboard box. PSU came with the following:

    ATX cable w/ 2 molex connectors and 3 floppy connectors
    MB-ON signal cable
    40mm fan w/3pin header
    Serial port dongle




    Testing methodology:

    Testing was performed under the harshest of conditions. 4 foot 18ga power wires were run off the beefy distribution block. This is very undersized for a 20 amp power supply. 10 or 12 ga is recommended. A voltage drop of almost 1 volt was measured across the wiring, meaning that the power supply got 12.6v if the carís electrical system was at 13.6v. This makes cranking even more harsh, as the car battery usually dips to 7-9v, the PSU was seeing 5-7v. Both power supplies were run without a fan, including during the temperature tests.



    Test Data:

    Voltages:



    Test data for the M1-ATX at full load was not available because I was unable to keep the computer from rebooting long enough to take readings.

    Temperatures:



    Data Analysis:

    Voltage rails on the DS-ATX are very, very solid. I noticed a fluctuation of about .02vDC, which is very, very good. The rails were dead on, even under load. Generally, as a power supply becomes overloaded, itsí rails begin to sag. This is evident in the M1-ATX, where the PSUís rails are beginning to sag appreciably. Voltage ripple is also very exceptional. ATX specifications require voltage ripple to be under 100mVAC, and the DS-ATX is well within specifications. I included the PC Power and Cooling power supply as a reference, simply to put the ripple voltage in perspective.

    Temperatures were exceptional for a power supply of this physical size and power output. The temperatures were 15-20C over ambient with passive cooling, indicating the power supply is not under heavy load, and also indicating component choice is good. Comparing to the M1-ATX, we see that the components get very hot, 30-40C over ambient. The component choice on the M1-ATX is poor for a system of this size. The inductors on the DS-ATX are much larger physically than the inductors on the M1-ATX.

    Shutdown controller / serial port / power and signal connections:

    I found the shutdown controller to be excellent. It is easily configurable over the serial port, and worked absolutely flawlessly. Compared to the M1-ATX, I found the DS-ATXís SDC to be much more powerful and adaptable. The serial port interface was also excellent, and easy to interface with Windows Hyperterminal. The reported voltages were very close to what was reported by my Fluke, like within .05vDC. Program mode worked excellently on the unit, as did forced shutdown. Power and signal connections were excellent, with beefy screw terminals for power, and solid plug/jumper blocks for signal and DC output. The serial port interface, however, needs revision, as it is too easy to bend/break the pins with the dongle sticking up from the main board. If a 4 pin extension cable was made, the dongle could be laid flat, and accidental tugs on the serial able would not bend the dongle off.

    Overall analysis:

    I am extremely impressed with this PSU. It is evident that a significant amount of design and testing went into this. It is by far the best DC-DC PSU I have used, and has the most adaptable shutdown controller known to me. I have used it about 1 hour so far, and have had absolutely no problems. I should add that Through 4 hours of testing, I have noticed no voltage rail fluctation, even with heavy bass, and cranking.

    Pros:
    -Very high output, under rated power supply
    -Robust shutdown controller
    -Great voltages and temperatures
    -Very good value at anything less than $200

    Cons:
    -Serial interface is prone to physical damage


    Revisions:
    9/23/05 - fixed URL, added comment in overall analysis, added comment in testing methodology

  2. #2
    Fusion Brain Creator
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    2,221
    Reserved for future posts/pictures

  3. #3
    The Curator
    Auto Apps:loading...
    Blue ZX3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Chicago area,IL
    Posts
    5,079
    Very Impressive Review...the only thing that would come to mind would be how would it compare to the opus (220w?)? If and when it comes out. Sounds better and cheaper....duh
    RideRunner...The #1 FE, PERIOD.

    Current Project: DFXVoice [v1.0 Released]
    Next in line: RRMedia v2.0

    DFX 5.1.1 Skin
    Appstore Link

    My RideRunner Plugins
    RRMedia
    RRExtended
    DFXVoice

    "There are no bugs - only undocumented features."

  4. #4
    Newbie
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    1

    thanks so much greenman

    great review.

    greenman rocks! greenman rocks!

  5. #5
    FLAC
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Portland OR
    Posts
    1,244
    Quote Originally Posted by carsforlife
    great review.

    greenman rocks! greenman rocks!
    Yes, Thanks for the review! I'm going to work on getting an extension cable for the serial port. I am also going to have a USB option.

    I hope the other beta testers will follow your lead and provide pictures. That was great!

    -Jeff
    MPEGBOX - Plexiglass Computer
    www.mpegbox.com

  6. #6
    Fusion Brain Creator
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    2,221
    3 days, 10 hours, no complaints.

  7. #7
    MySQL Error Scouse Monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Bristol
    Posts
    9,727
    greenman, you have PM

  8. #8
    Newbie cell21633's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Chicago, IL, USA
    Posts
    48
    i was greeted by the usps box when i arrived from school today.

    for now, i'll post what i received. i won't be able to test until this weekend, the earliest.

    i'll add onto the previous posts with some more pictures and closer views.
    please be careful when opening the box. when i opened mine, a jumper cap fell out of the box. not sure if it's packaged in any of the bags and fell out, or was simply added by mistake. i emailed zootjeff about this, i'll see if it was packaged accidentally because i don't see any pins on which to put the jumper cap on anyway..


    contents of box. no bubble packaging this time, but the contents were well protected from the box and shredded paper wrapping.


    from left to right - cables, dsatx psu, serial dongle.


    closer view of serial dongle.


    closer view of fan with 3 pin header.


    closer view of atx header


    mb-on cable


    12v 4pin power header


    dsatx psu


    dsatx psu


    solder points - look clean and solid


    misc header pins


    power terminals - note the 20amp fuse in bright yellow


    top view


    closer view of serial dongle


    another angle


    the good - the components look solidly built.
    a few little nitpicks - the 20amp fuse looks like it might be difficult to remove, considering the proximity to the main power input terminals. the atx header is hard to insert and remove from the psu. the power terminal screws are hard to turn.
    RED 1999 ACURA INTEGRA GSR STOLEN -- CHICAGO 02/27/08
    VIN JH4DC2391XS002416
    PLATE ILLINOIS 5287412
    Team Integra Markings on Rear Quarterpanel Windows
    REPORT TO 911 IF FOUND

  9. #9
    Fusion Brain Creator
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    2,221
    very nice pics, which I'd had macro capibility.

    As for the screw terminals, I'd rather them be stiff, so they stay tight..

  10. #10
    FLAC
    Join Date
    Apr 2001
    Location
    Portland OR
    Posts
    1,244
    Quote Originally Posted by cell21633
    the good - the components look solidly built.
    a few little nitpicks - the 20amp fuse looks like it might be difficult to remove, considering the proximity to the main power input terminals. the atx header is hard to insert and remove from the psu. the power terminal screws are hard to turn.
    Yaa, the Fuse is Hard to remove, the best way is get some needle nose pliers. If you use those, it is very easy. It was either put it there or grow the board...

    -Jeff
    MPEGBOX - Plexiglass Computer
    www.mpegbox.com

Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. FAQ: Power Supplies Explained (Part 1)
    By Bugbyte in forum The FAQ Emporium
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 06-10-2007, 07:45 AM
  2. Frequently Asked Questions
    By bgoodman in forum The FAQ Emporium
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 05-03-2005, 06:25 PM
  3. 1 Week until Christmas, Where's the Opus 220W PSU?
    By schapman43 in forum Power Supplies
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 12-19-2004, 05:02 AM
  4. What to look for in a PSU some info for you
    By cproaudio in forum Power Supplies
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 04-04-2003, 01:07 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •