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Thread: 02 Land Rover Freelander

  1. #11
    Newbie gunshotspunture's Avatar
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    hey man would this be something i needhttp://cgi.ebay.com/DC-DC-ATX-Power-...QQcmdZViewItem

  2. #12
    Newbie gunshotspunture's Avatar
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  3. #13
    Phillie Escalade182's Avatar
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    are you retarded?

  4. #14
    Variable Bitrate Freelander's Avatar
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    gunshot, c'mon

    i defended you in your post, and now you do this? this is a worklog. this thread is for questions and comments regarding my setup. i'll get back to your post if you want.

  5. #15
    Newbie gunshotspunture's Avatar
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    sorry....im a noob

  6. #16
    Phillie Escalade182's Avatar
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    lol. you dont need a dc-dc psu on a laptop....everythings already dc. unless you want to go dc-dc-dc-dc. lol

  7. #17
    Variable Bitrate Freelander's Avatar
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    Overdue Update

    I know itís been a while since my last update. Iíve been pretty busy, however work is still progressing. Hereís my status.

    The sunroof switch was wired up to be the startup/shutdown button of the computer. I really like how the switch sends the computer into shutdown, not just cut the power. I am unaware if all computers do this, but this is a great feature. Iíll simply press the switch when I park my car. The screen, powered by the carnetix, will turn off and the laptop will shut down as I am walking away.

    The screen housing is moving slowly, but surely in the right direction. The cupholder in the first post was gutted and rebuilt. This is the most time-consuming part of my build, due to the originality and complexity of the piece. When closed, it will look exactly like the closed cupholder. No one could have any idea that there was a screen. The housing is manually opened to show the screen. Sorry I donít have a chance to upload pictures yet, but hopefully I can in the near future.

    Although I am somewhat familiar with electronics and electrical wiring, I have never installed a car stereo. This task is definitely the toughest part of my build. I spent most of Saturday running lines, until the snow arrived. Iíve run 4 gauge from the battery to the dash. A distribution block will split the power between two 8 gauge lines, one running to the Carnetix, and one to the Lind power adapter.

    All the major software is installed and working well. IGuidance modifications and phone control will come later. The major remaining tasks are as follows:

    1) Complete the monitor housing. Ė This housing forces slow progress. I end up working on it a few hours one night. Then I spend the next few days contemplating the next part. I only have one of the pieces, so I canít afford a mistake. Itís coming out how I wanted it, so I wonít get too upset about the speed.

    2) Complete running the power lines. Ė I park on the street in Brooklyn, so working on my car is pretty tough. Actually, I donít work on my car in Brooklyn for a couple of reasons. I look like I am stealing the radio out of my own car. Also, if people see what I am doing, theyíll come back later and take it. I usually have to work on it during weekends somewhere else. I try and go snowboarding whenever I can, like this coming weekend. Unfortunately, it sets back the installation another week.

    3) Wire the Carnetix. Ė I need to wire the Carnetix to the distribution block. I guess Iíll solder the 8 gauge wire to the Carnetix input. I need to run wire to the Xenarc, USB hub, etc. I need to find some kind of cheap M/F connector for these electronics. I donít want to order something this small online. Iíd like to find it in a store nearby.

    Overall, the project is looking good and nearing completion. Iíll try to complete the wiring Monday, since I donít work that day. And like I said before, Iíll try and post some pictures of the install soon.

  8. #18
    Variable Bitrate Freelander's Avatar
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    Monitor Housing

    I needed to install a touchscreen monitor it into my car, while maintaining the original project goals. The screen must be completely unnoticeable when not in use. I do not want to make the screen look OEM, use an in-dash unit, or cover it with something while parked. The car must look stock when the car computer is not in use. Therefore, the screen must be hidden in some part of the dash.

    In the center of my dash there is a useless cupholder. As I mentioned earlier, the cupholder is the natural choice for the screen location. I opened it up and measured the inside. I took plenty of measurements, and found there was just enough room for a Xenarc 700TS. After purchasing the monitor, I placed it into the cupholder and its width fit perfectly.

    I researched the forum extensively for ideas. Although most members fabricated their screens into their dash, some people created custom opening enclosures. Bugbyte used a servo to open his LCD from the top of the dash. Another forum member talked about using linear actuators to push the screen open. There were some great ideas in these threads, and I started working.

    The cupholder opened with a front and rear flap. Each flap was held with its own pin. (This was very important because installing hinges and attempting to have them line up could become a major obstacle.) I cut out the bottom, springs, and latches. I cut off the front flap and mounted it to the rear flap, so it would open as one large piece. Now I needed to mount the screen on the flap. The easy way would have been to put a bolt through the piece. Actually, I would have been more comfortable with a mechanical connection such as a bolt. However, I needed to glue some hardware on the inside so the screen was unnoticeable. After much searching, I ended up using miscellaneous hardware from Home Depot to mount the screen. Iím still not sure what they are called, but they are two posts threaded on the inside with a large base flange. This piece provided enough surface area for which I was comfortable holding the screen. I then screwed in short bolts to complete the mount. The xenarc slides perfectly down these posts from the top. It is held securely in place.



    Since the monitor was thicker than the cupholder was deep, it would have to sit in the dash. I cut a hole through the top of the dash to match the inside dimensions of the cupholder. There was barely enough room after trimming flanges of the AC/heater vents. I am still not sure if I will have enough room to place a clean base in the hole when I am finished.

    The next step was to mechanize the enclosure. I liked the idea of servos and linear actuators, but there was little room in the dash to install something with the proper lever arm. I was forced to make the enclosure open a different way. I was not upset since it would save money, and I did not have to worry about controller boards.

    After much thought, I decided the enclosure would open, and stay open by the power of springs. The enclosure would be closed manually, and locked. I needed to find torsion springs with the appropriate force, and long enough legs to transfer the energy. Although there are many spring manufacturers, none wanted to sell me just two. I started to look into taking apart common objects for their parts. I thought about fold up alarm clocks, toys, and finally found the jackpot. Cheap salad tongs were perfect. I cut the springs from the tongs and installed them into the enclosure at the pivot point. There was not enough force to keep the flap open with the weight of the screen. I adjusted the legs to add a greater opening angle. They worked perfectly.

  9. #19
    Variable Bitrate Freelander's Avatar
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    After sliding in the monitor, I used ABS cement to glue a slotted piece above the monitor. The original button from the cupholder was modified to act as a pin. When the housing is closed, the pin is inserted to hold it down. I then glued some molding pieces to aid in keeping the monitor sturdy. I still have some finish work to do on the trim.

    When closed, the unit looks exactly like the original dash. When opened, the springs hold the monitor upright and stable.








  10. #20
    Newbie
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    hmm based on the timestamp, my guess is you are at work. Being very productive i see.

    Ha, busting ya balls man

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